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Greeting. 



To all who read this Book; Greeting: 

It is with pride that we review the history of W. V. U. 
for the past year, and it is with pride that we present this 
book, the chronicle of the School's history to those who 
wish to read it. Consider well its merits, view lightly its 
faults, for we have given as much time to its compilation 
as school work would permit, and sometimes a great deal 
more. With a feeling of mingled pride and relief, we 
submit our book to that greatest of all critics, the Public. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/monticola14west 



Dedication. 



Co our good friend, €. 6dmund Hcil, we 
the Junior Class, dedicate our most valued 
treasure, Cbe monticola '12 




C. EDMUND NEIL 



<L griimtnd Neil, £.%., £.TO. 



*A'v' 







EDMUND NEIL was born at Jacksonville, 

Illinois. October 12th, 1871. His parents 
were both English. 

He attended the public schools of Illinois. 
[n IS!).") he graduated firom McKendree Col- 
lege, taking the degree of A. B. lie was val- 
edictorian of his class, receiving the highest 
average grade that had been recorded in 
McKendree College for twenty-five years. In 
18!)7, he graduated from the Ohio Wesleyan School of Ora- 
tory, and later took the degree of A. M. from Ohio Wesleyan 
University. For some time Mr. Neil had devoted his chief 
attention to the work of Expression, and from 1895 till 1898 
he was the special private pupil of Mr. Leland T. Powers, 
during the summer seasons in Boston. 

He was Instructor in Elocution in Ohio Wesleyan Uni- 
versity 1895-6, and Assistant Professor of Oratory in the 
same institution 1896-7. In 1897 he was elected Professor 
of Oratory in Denison University which position he filled 
till the following year when he resigned to accept a position 
with the Centra] Lyceum Bureau. Under this management 
Mr. Neil appeared on many of the leading lecture courses 
of nearly every stale east of the Rocky .Mountains, lie was 
engaged in platform work exclusively for three seasons. 

Preferring educational work, Mi - . Neil returned to Deni- 
son University in 190] where he remained as Professor of 
Oratory for two years, resigning to accept the position in 
West Virginia University which he has continued to hold 
till the present time. 

Mr. Neil organized the Tri State Debating League, com- 

8 



posed of the West Virginia University, Wooster University, 
and the University of Pittsburg'. Through his untiring ef- 
forts and the splendid work of the students who were ever 
loyal to him, our own institution succeeded in winning five 
out of six of the inter-collegiate debates. In 1909, he or- 
ganized the University Dramatic Club. The wisdom of this 
move lias been proved by the hearty interest which the stu- 
dents have taken in it and the loyal cooperation which they 
have given. The benefit of the work is strongly attested by 
the excellent presentation of plays which the Club has given 
in Morgantown and other cities. 

Mr. Neil has traveled extensively in nearly every coun- 
try of Europe. He is a member of the Sigmi Chi fraternity 
and of Theta Xu Epsiloaa. He is Chairman of the "Ways 
and Means Committee of the University. 



Va. UNIVERSITY 

mawst 





10 






Tht Farultg 






«**>« 



DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, Ph.D., LL. D. 

President and Professor of Philosophy. 

JAMES SCOTT STEWART, B. S., M. S. 

Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus. 

WILLIAM PATRICK WILLEY, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Equity, Jurisprudence, and Commercial Law. 



ALEXANDER REID WHITEHILL, A.M. 
Professor of Chemistry. 



Ph.D. 



THOMAS CLARK ATKESON, M.S., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Colleg of Agriculture and professor of Agri- 
culture. 

FREDERIC LINCOLN EMORY, M. M. E., M. E. 

Professor of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics. 

SAMUEL BOARDMAN BROWN, A. B., A.M. 

Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A.M., L. H. D. 

Professor of English Language and Literature and Head 
of the Department of English. 

BERT HOLMES HITE, M. S. 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM TRUSCOTT, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature. 

HENRY SHERWOOD GREEN, A. B., LL. D. 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 



CLEMENT ROSS JONES, B. S. C. E., M. M. E 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

WILL HAZEN BOUGHTON, B. S. C. E., C. E. 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS, B. S. C. E., C. E. 
Professor of Civil Engineering. 

JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, A. M„ Ph. D. 
Professor of Education. 

JOHN LEWIS SHELDON, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE. 
Dean of Women. 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

ANTHONY WENCEL CHEZ, A. B. 

Director of Physical Training. 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON, A. B., M. D. 

Professor of Anataomy and Physiology and Head of the 
Medical Faculty at Morgantown. 

JOHN HARRINGTON COX, Ph.D., A.M. 
Professor of English Philology. 

CHARLES EDGAR HOGG, LL. D. 

Dean of the College of Law and Professor of Constitu- 
tional and International Law. 

FREDERICK LAWRENCE KORTRIGHT, B. S., D. Sc. 
Professor of Chemistry. 



11 



FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A. B., A.M. 
Professor of Latin. 

WILLIAM S. WEEKS, A. B. 

Lieutenant U. S. Army, Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics and Commandant of Cadets. 

JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph. B., Ph. D. 
Professor of Mathematics. 

ALBERT MOORE REESE, A. B., Ph.D. 
Professor of Zoology. 

OLIVER PERRY CHITWOOD, A. B., Ph.D. 
Professor of European History. 

C. EDMUND NEIL, A. B., A. M. 

Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 

JAMES RUSSELL TROTTER, LL. B., Ph.D. 
Professor of Law. 

CHAUNCEY WILLIAM WAGGONER, A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics. 

WAITMAN BARBE, A.M., Litt. D. 

Assistant to the President and Associate Professor of 
English Language and Literature. 

WILLIAM JACKSON LEONARD, 

Associate Professor of Fine Arts. 

DANIEL WEBSTER WORKING, B. Sc, A.M. 

Superintendent of Agricultural Extension Work. 

SIMEON CONANT SMITH, A. B., A.M. 
Professor of Rhetoric. 

LLOYD LOWNDES FRIEND, 

Associate Professor of Secondary Education. 

MADISON STATHERS, A. B., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

ARETAS WI LP 1 1 It NOLAN, A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture, Forestry, and Econ- 
omic Entomology. 



DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS, A. B., LL. M. 

Head of the Department of Commerce. 

FREDERIC RANDOM WHIPPLE, M.D.Y. 

Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS LUEDER, D. V. M. 
Instructor in Dairying. 

CHARLES WALKER SPRINGER, V. M. D. 
Instructor in Veterinary Science. 

THOMAS HOWARD GATHER, 

instructor in Machine Shop and General Foreman of Shops 

JOHN BEHNY GRUMBEIN, 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering and Foreman ot 

Wood Shop. 

ROBERT BRUCE BRINSMADE, B. S., E. M. 
Professor of Mining Engineering. 

ARTHUR POLLING GRAVES, A. B., A.M. 
Instructor in German. 

ARLEIGH LEE DARBY, A. B., A.M. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

MABEL CONSTANCE FOSTER, 
Assistant in Piano. 

LOUISE FERRIS CHEZ, 

Assistant Director of Physical Training in C harge of the 
Women's Gymnasium. 

RUFUS ASA WEST, 

Assistant in Metal Working and Stationary Engineer. 

URIAH BARNES, LL. B. 

Assistant in Law. 

NEVA AUGUSTA SCOTT, 

Assistant in Domestic Science. 

BENJAMIN WALTER KING, A. B. 
Assistant in Commerce. 



12 



LOUIS BLACK, 

Director of the School of Music and Head of the Depart- 
ment of Vocal Music. 

MARGARET WINTON HORNE, 
Instructor in Violin. 

EVA EMMA HUBBARD, 

Instructor in Drawing and Painting. 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, B. M. 

Instructor on the Piano and Pipe Organ. 

RUDOLF WERTIME, 

Head of Piano Department. 

DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A. B., A. M. 
Instructor in English. 



WILLIAM HENRY GALLUP, A. B., A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics and History in the Preparatory 
School. 

MARGRAET BUCHANAN, A. B. 

Instructor in Greek and Mathematics. 

W. A. MESTREZAT, 

Assistant in Music (Wind Instruments). 

THOMAS BOND FOULK, B. S., C. E. 

Instructor in Mathematics in the Preparatory School and 
Graduate Manager of Athletics. 

HELEN LOVELAND TREAT, 
Assistant in Music. 



LIBRARY STAFF 

LUCY ELLA FAY Librarian 

JESSICA GARDINER CONE Assistant Librarian 

DORA MOORE, Ph. B Assistant Librarian 

KATHERINE CLIFTON HEDRICK Assistant in Law Library 

ANNA GRACE COX Assistant Librarian 



W, VA. UMVBBSTY 




13 




PRESIDENT, DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON 

14 




PRESIDENT ELECT, THOMAS ED .YARD HODGES 




16 




18 



*"i r 





N 



3U 






19 






Senior Officers 



JOHN DUNHAM GARRISON President 

CLARA ELIZABETH DICKASON Vice President 

VIOLA AMANDA WOLFE Secretary 

CHARLES G. BAKER Treasurer 

PEARL LOUISE REINER Poet 

BURRELL KEMP LITTLEPAGE Orator 



zv 







JOHN DUNHAM GARRISON, A. B. 
Sigma Nu; Mountain; Y. M. C. A.; Ma- 
sonic Club; Marshall College Club; Presi- 
dent Senior Class. 




CHARLES G. BAKER, A. B. 
Kappa Alpha; Sphinx; Mountain; Y. M. 
C. A.; Columbian Literary Society; Mem- 
ber Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, four years; Mon- 
ticola Board, 1910; Assistant Manager Base 
Ball, 1910; Cadet Captain Co. C, 1910-11; 
First Medal Target Practice, 1910. 




VIOLA AMANDA WOLFE, A. B. 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A.; Parthenon 
Literary Society; Y. W. C. A Cabinet, 1909; 
Secretary Parthenon Literary Society, 1910; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1910; Secretary Senior 
Class, 1911; Critic, Parthenon Literary So- 
ciety, 1911. 



21 






CLAY DILLIE AMOS, A. B. 
Delta Tau Delta; Mountain; Sphinx; Y. 
M. C. A.; Y. M. ('. A. Cabinet; Business 
Manager Monticola Board, 1910; Exchange 
Editor Athenaeum, 1911; Football, 1911. 



ARTHUR BROWN HODGES, A. B. 
Phi Kappa Psi; Mountain; Sphinx; Areo- 
pagus, V. V. Club; Y. M. C. A.; Parthe- 
non Literary Society; Editor University 
Handbook, 1909; Editor Monticola, 1910; 
Manager Dramatic Club, 1910; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabient, 1910; Member Honor Committee 
of College of Law, 1911; Van of Y. Y. Club. 
1911; Grammatus of Areopagus, 1911. 



CLARA ELIZABETH DICKASON, A. B. 

Chi Omega; Y. YV. ('. A.; Woman's 
League; Pan Hellenic Association; Secre- 
tary Pan Hellenic Association, 1909; Sec- 
retary Junior <'lass. 1910; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, L910; Vice President Senior Class, 
1911; Executive Committee of Woman's 
League. 



22 




EVA MERTELLE FLING, A. B. 
Alpha Xi Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Parthenon 
Literary Society; University Grange; Mar- 
shall College Club; Woman's League; Na- 
ture Study Club; President Marshall Col- 
lege Club, 1910; V. President Y. W. C. A., 
1910; Chorister Parthenon Literary Society, 
1910; Monongalian Board, 1911. 




GUY HERMAN BURNSIDE, LL. B. 
Delta Tau Delta; Mountain; Y. M. C. A.; 
Columbian Literary Society; Fairmont Nor- 
mal Club; Masonic Club; Athletic Board, 
1909; Athletic Editor Athenaeum, 1909; 
Business Manager Athenaeum, 1910; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer Military Ball Commit- 
tee, 1910. 




ALEXANDER DEACON BELL, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. 



B. S. M. E. 



23 






^^ 



^LWJ&jT 






SAM BIERN, LL. B. 



ANNA GRACE COX, A. B. 
Y. W. C. A.; Columbian Literary Society; 
English Club; Beowulf Club; Rec. Sec. Col- 
umbian Literary Society, 1909; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, 1910; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1910. 



ROBERT SIDNEY REED, A. B. 

Phi Kappa I'si; Mountain; Sphinx; Mon- 
ticola Board, 1910; Manager Base Ball 
Team, 1911. 



24 




EDWARD SIDNEY BOCK, A. B. LL. B. 
Delta Tau Delta; English Club; Assist. 
Editor Athenaeum, 1909. 




t*^®** 



BERNARD LEE HUTCHINSON, B. S. 
Delta Tau Delta; Delta Chi; Mountain; 
Sphinx; Y. M. C. A.; President Freshman 
Class, 1908; Treasurer Sophomore Class, 
1909; Monticola Board, 1910; Football, '06, 
"07, '08, '09, Captain '09; Baseball, '09, '10, 
'11, Captain '11. 




STANLEY RHEY COX, 
Sigma Chi. 



A. B. 



25 







HOWARD KENWELL BURRELL, B.S.C.E. 



MARIE CLASSINE BERGHUIS KRAK, 

A. B. 
Alpha Xi Delta; Beowulf Club; Choral 
Society. 



10. !•'. ALL. MAX. 



26 




HARRY LUCAS CAMPBELL, 
Beta Theta Pi. 



B. S. C. E. 




CLARK CULBERTSON BURRITT, B.S.C E. 
Beta Theta Pi; Mountain; Sphinx; Aero- 
pagus; Athletic Board of Control. 




NANCY PURLEY MORGAN, A. B. 
Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League; Colum- 
bian Literary Society. 



27 






OTTO DALE ELSOX, B. S.C. E. 

Kappa Alpha. 



STELLA REBECCA WILSON, A. B. 
Y. \V. C. A.; Woman's League; Parthenon 
Literary Society. 



KliWAUl) HILL TI'CKWILLICR, A. B. 



L'S 




HOWARD FRANKLIN FLESHMAN, A. B. 
Y. M. C. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; 
John W. Davis Democratic Club; Business 
Manager of the Athenaeum, 1910, 1911. 




PEARL LOUISE REINER, A. B. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; English Club; V. 
V. Club; Choral Society; Monticola Board, 
1910; Junior Week Committee, 1910; See- 
har English Club, 1911; First Prize Frontis- 
piece Monticola, 1908, 1910, 1911. 




SIDNEY LOTH FRIEDMAN, LL. B. 
Masonic Club; Columbian Literary So- 
ciety; Chorister Columbian Literary So- 
ciety, 1911. 



29 






GEORGE HUTCHINSON GUNNOE, LL. B. 
Sigma Nu. 



GOLDIE SHEETS, A. B. 
Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League, 
Society. 



Choral 



RICHARD JAY GOULD, U.S. E.M. 
Sigma Chi; Sphinx; Theta Nu Epsilon; 

V. ,\i. c. A.; President Freshman Class, 
1908; Manager Second Base Hall Team, 
1910; Manager Track Team, 1911. 



30 




JULIUS HENRY HBFKE, B. S. 
Y. M. C. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; 
John W. Davis Democratic Club; University 
Orchestra; Manager Senior Track, 1911; 
First Sergeant Cadet Corps, 1911. 




GENEVIEVE STEALEY, A. B. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; R. J's.; Y. W. 
C. A.; Woman's League; Grange; Vice 
Pres. Y. W. C. A., 1910; Vice Pres. Wo- 
man's League, 1910; Athenaeum Board, 
1910; Y. W. C. A. Delegate; Mt. Lake Park 
Delegate; Student Volunteer Convention, 
Rochester, N. Y. 




ROBERT ARBUCKLE 
B. S. C. E. 



HANDLEY. 






DAVID HARMAN KAHN, B. S. E. M. 
Theta Nu Epsilon; Mountain; Athletic 
Board Control, 1910. 



GLENN HUNTER, LL. B. 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Mountain; English 
Club; Areopagus; Sphinx; V. V. Club; Y. 
M. C. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; His- 
torian Junior Law Class, 1908; Pres. Y. M. 
C. A., 1910; Monticola Hoard, 1910; Chair- 
man Junior Prom. Committee, 1910; Head 
of the Mountain, 1910; Pres. Student's Pub- 
lishing Association, 1910; Summit of the 
Mountain, 1911; Head of the English Club, 
1911; Senior Archon Areopagus, 1911; Vice 
Pres. Y. M. C, A., 1911; Voticum V. V. Club, 
1911; Class Orator, 1911. 



LORY FRANCIS ICE, LL. B. 
Beta Theta Pi. 



32 




HELEN MERWIN WIESTLING, A. B. 

R. J's; V. V.; English Club; Beowulf 
Gedryht; Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League; 
Grange; Parthenon Literary Society; Y. W. 
C. A.; Delegate Mt. Lake Park, 1909; Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet, 1910; Monticola Board, 1910; 
Junior Week Committee, 1910; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, .1911; Woman's League Board, 




BURREL KEMP LITTLEPAGE, LL. B. 
Sigma Chi. 



1911; Class Historian, 1911; 
lish Club, 1911; Boc-Weard, 



Seeker 
Beowulf 



Eng- 
Club. 




EMILY J. WILMOTH, A. B. 
Chi Omega; Beowulf Gedryht; Parthe- 
non Literary Society; Y. W. C. A.; Woman's 
League; Dramatic Club; V. V. Club; R. J's; 
Secretary Dramatic Club, 1910; Pres. Pan 
Hellenic, 1911; Assist. Editor Athenaeum, 
1911; Pres. Beowulf Gedryht, 1911. 



33 









HORANCE LABAN WHITE, A. B. 
Pi Kappa Alpha; English Club; Moun- 
tain; Parthenon Literary Society; Beowulf 
Club; Debating Association, Y. M. C. A.; 
Vice President Y. M. 0. A., 1908; Debating 
Team, 190S; President Parthenon Literary 
Society, 1909. 



CHARLES MELVIN LOUGH, B. S. 
Y. M. C. A., University Grange; Parthe- 
non Literary Society; John W. Davis Dem- 
ocratic Club; Vice Pres. P. L. S„ 1910; 
President P. L. S„ 1910; President John \V. 
Davis Democratic Club, 1910, 1911; Ath- 
letic Editor Athenaeum, 1910, 1911; Assist. 
Manager Track Team, 1910; Regent's Prize 
in Essav Writing. 1910. 



GEORGE TRUMAN TWYFORD, B. S. C. E. 

Phi Sigma Kappa; V. M. C A.; Athletic 

Board of Control, 1909; Monticola Hoard. 

1910; Secretary of V. M. C. A., '(is. '09, 10. 



34 




, 




DAVID BRIGHT REGER, B. S. C. E. 
Phi Kappa Fsi; President Student's Pub- 
lishing Association, 1909; A. B., 1909. 




HERMAN DIEDLER POCOCK, B. S. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Areopagus; Moun- 
tain; Sphinx; Theta Nu Epsilon; Y. M. C. 
A.; Assist. Manager Football, 1910; Vice 
Pres. Class, 1910; Monticola Board, 1910; 
Captain Gym Team; Manager Football, 
1910. 




EDWARD CURTIS OLDHAM. 
Kappa Alpha. 



B. S. M. E. 



35 






HU SWISHER YAXDERVORT, B. S. Agr. 
Kappa Alpha; University Grange; Y. M. 

('. A. 



LOXXIK WATTERSON RYAN. 
Sigma Xu: Theta Nu Epsilon; Moun- 
tain; Cadet Officer's Club; Areopagus; 
Pan Hellenic Dance Committee; President 
Freshman Class, 1908; Cadet Captain, 1908; 
Coacb Sophomore Football Team, 1909; 
Football, l!»li); Basket Ball, 1909. 



JOHN LOWRIE ROBINSON, A. B. 
v. M. C. A.; Columbian Literary Society; 
Cadet Captain Co. A, 1911; Business Man 
ager Monongalian, 1911. 



36 




RALPH THOMAS THAYER, B. S. C. E. 

Sigma Chi; Theta Nu Epsilon; 

Sphinx. 




WILLIAM REYNOLDS THACHER, A. B. 
Sigma Nu; Y. M. C. A.; Columbian Lit. 
erary Society; I. O. O. F. ; First Lieutenant 
Co. A, 1908; Vice Pres. and Treasurer Col- 
umbian Literary Society, 1908; Distin- 
guished Cadet. 




HARRY CASPER STULTING, 
Sigma Nu. 



B. S. C. E. 



37 






GKORGE WALTER GROW, B. S. M. E. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Y. M. C. A.; Moun- 
tain Club; Cadet Corps; Gold Medal for 
Drill and Discipline, 1909; Cadet Captain, 
1910; Cadet Major, 1911; President Y. M. 
C. A., 1911; Captain Gym. Team, 1911; 
Manager Track Team, 1911. 



GEORGE HAROLD CUMMINS, B. S. M. E. 
Phi Kappa Sigma. 



A. R. WILLIAMS. 



:;s 




JOSEPH COCHRAN VANCE, LL. B. 
A. B., 1910. 
John W. Davis Democratic Club; Y. M. 
C. A.; Parthenon Literary Society; Regents 
Prize in Declamation, 1908; Bryan Prize in 
Political Science, 1908; Regents Prize in 
Composition, 1909; Ivy Poet, Class of 1910; 
President Parthenon Literary Society, 1911. 




WYLIE EVERETTE LLOYD, B. S. Agr. 

University Grange; Cadet Officers Club; 
Captain Cadets, 1906-7; Cadet Major, 1906-7; 
Basket Ball, 1907. 




CHARLES WILLIAM LOUCHERY, LL. B. 
Sigma Chi. 



39 



HOW THE CLASS OF '11 GOT ITS FAME 



O 






rnr 



NCE uiioii a time. O My Best Beloved, in tli- 

Mountain State and in the county which was 

called Monongalia, there was a 'Varsity. It 

was situated about half-way between Opekis- 

ka and Point Marion on the beautiful and 

\t|jB/ philogious hanks of the Monongahela River 

jjr 'Varsity was renowned, famed, and praised, 

up and down, and far and wide, as an ex 

eellent, thorough and celebrated seat of learning. And, in 

the dim, dark ages, there came to this 'Varsity many classes. 

of varying and widely differing degrees of intelligence and 

experience. But, at Last, came the class, which was called 

Nineteen Eleven and which was destined to outshine all the 

others and to make History. 

The iirsl volume of this History, Bes1 Beloved, was com- 
paratively small and insignificant and inconsequential. It 
told how the class was defeated in the Rush with one of the 
other nameless classes and how it took defeat bravely and 
sturdily and cheerfully. It (old. moreover, of how this class 
astonished the Profs with its "Teat wisdom and sagacity. (The 
Profs. Best Beloved, were the superlatively excellent men who 
ran t be 'Varsity. 

The second volume of this History was much more im 
portant and significanl and impressive than the preceding 
.me. But, even in this, the superiority and ability of the 



class did not show to the greatest advantage. Again, it was 
defeated in the Rush, and again it bore it's defeat cheerily. 
But in the barbaric, and unconventional and uncivilized 
games of base-ball, basket-ball and foot-ball, it was uncon- 
querable and unapproachable. And on the track, no other 
class could pass or surpass it. This volume also tells of a 
ceilain piece of wanton wickedness and mischief which the 
class perpetrated, at the time of the Junior Boat Ride on the 
nameless class which was it's deadly and mortal enemy. And 
what. Best Beloved, do you suppose this piece of wanton 
wickedness was.' The Class stole the nameless class's Presi- 
dent! — And with the recital and narration of this daring 
piece of wanton wickedness the second volume close's. 

The third volume. Best Beloved, contains chiefly and 
principally and almost entirely an account of the Monticola 
and of Junior Week. It told of how the learned and illus- 
trious Board, after much labor and trouble and pains, pro- 
duced a Monticola which will ever be a pride and joy to The 
('lass. It told also of Junior Week — that week in which The 
Class shone in all its glory and it's fame spread abroad into 
all the land, it told about the Smoker held by the boys of 
Nineteen Eleven and of what a jolly, rollicking time they 
had. II told about the .May Festival given by the girls of 
the 'Varsity and of how pretty and charming they were in 
their white dresses and fantastic costumes. It told of that 
memorable and never-to-be- forgotten day at Oak Park where 



40 



The Class had its picnic. It told how the little country hand 
made music for the dancing in the rickety pavillion and of 
how the boys and girls of The Class enjoyed the boating. It 
told, also, of the "Shute-the-shute, '' which was very steep 
and deep and slippery and flippery and exciting and fascinat 
ing. It told of the glorious games with W. & J. and it told. 
last but not least, of the grand and glorious and splendid and 
enjoyable Prom. Of how the music was so entrancing, and 
the lights so dazzling, and the men so handsome, and the 
girls so enchanting, and of all the other things too numerous 
to mention. And with this the third volume closed. . 

The fourth volume of this series, O Best One. was very 
thick, and ponderous, and heavy, for The Class was getting 
old and wise in the affairs of state and was engaged in many 
weighty and important and grave and serious matters. It 
also had to assume a dignity and repose of manner commen- 
surate with the impressiveness of it's caps and gowns. It set 
tlic standard for all the younger classes and constantly in- 
creased in importance and prestige and fame. The members 
of The Class had by this time become the props and pillars 



and ornaments of the various and several and different so- 
cieties. But the best product of The Class's energies was 
Commencement Week — when The Class commenced it's life 
in the outside world. The book told about the Baccalaureate 
Sunday, and about the splendid Class Day when the Nineteen 
Eleven Ivy was planted, and about the solemn time in Com- 
mencement Hall when all the members of The Class received 
their diplomas and degrees, and about the sumptious Alumni 
Banquet, and. last of all, about the sad leave-takings between 
the members of The Class. 

But, Best Beloved, there is still another volume which is 
being written and which will surpass in splendor all these 
others. It will tell of how the members of The Class rose to 
eminence and fame and of all their wonderful and glorious 
deeds, and of their noble and generous hearts, striving for 
the good of their country. And when this volume is printed, 
then the 'Varsity will be very and extremely and exceedingly 
proud of The Class of Nineteen Eleven, prouder than it is 
even now, — and that is saying a good deal. 

—THE HISTORIAN. 




41 




GRETCHEN WARRICK. 

Piano. 





(Braduates in 5tlusic 



FLORENCE SMITH. 
Piano. 




,**a« 



> 




IVA GINKLE; 
Piano. 



CHARLOTTE BLAIR. 

Voice. 



42 




43 



Junior Officers 



JACKSON VAN BUREN BLAIR, JR President 

WALTER BERYL CROWL Vice President 

GEORGE B. VIEWIG Treasurer 

IRENE MARIE ANDRIS Secretary 

MALVIN REINHEIMER Historian 



44 





JACK BLAIR. 

There was a young Junior named Blair, 

Who had most remarkable hair. 

When he called on a girl, 

It would never curl, 

But stuck straight up in the air. 




GEORGE VIEWIG. 

George Viewig is the treasurer, 
He handles all the dough, 
But where all the money goes, 
The Juniors want to know. 



IRENE ANDRIS. 

Irene Andris tall and fair, 
Shining nose and shining hair, 
Red of lip and pink of cheek. 
Stars in Social life and Greek. 



45 





PEARL COMPTON. 

Pearl stands for whirl, 

For she is the girl, 

Who never is still for a minute. 

If there's something doing, 

Or if trouble's brewing, 

Pearl is sure to be in it. 




CLARK POOL. 

What means this raving, angry, 
Thai's gathered here in swirls, 
"lis not a bargain sale. Oh no! 
Just Clark Pool and his girls. 



mob, 



ROSCOE POSTEN. 

If ever you should want some fun, 
Roscoe Posten is the one. 
To get it for you on the run. 
Sometimes a joke, moretimes a pun, 
As funny as a tailors dun. 



4t; 





MARY HOLROYD. 

Dainty, petite, and awfully sweet, 
Ask "Buck" about those trips to Cheat. 
And though she is a quiet girl, 
She makes some hit in the Social Whirl. 




FRANK SANDER. 

His mouth is full of test tubes, 
His eyes are full of smoke. 
Not he to delve into the Law, 
Or Engineer till his hands are raw, 
He'll stick to Chemistry and choke. 



H. W. KING, JR. 

This merry young fellow named King, 
Isn't happy unless he can sing, 

Plays football like Hades, 

Is strong for the Ladies, 
And he's looking right now for "the" rinf 



47 









itf 



1*S0»* 





SUSAN SMITH. 

Susan Smith upon the stage, 

Set foot, and then was all the rage. 

But alas and alack, 

The love scene was slack, 

For John's name was not on the page. 




HARRY WHEAT. 

Hurry Wheat in appearance so neat, 

For Society cares not a rap. 

His specialty is history, 

And chewing "Honest Scrap". 



JOHN L. CORE. 

Lefty Core to all the town, 

A hero is of great renown. 

He boots the pigskin fifty yard, 

And swats the baseball awful hard, 

And though in Minstrel Shows he'd shine, 

Doctoring horses is his steady line. 



48 





Va 



GAIL DAVIS. 

Gail's from Sunny Side, 
And she has imbibed, 
That sunny nature, too, 
She makes the grades, 
And makes great raids, 
In languages old and new. 




THOMAS W. CRAWFORD. 

A wig of bright and fiery red, 
Is what adorns our Tommie's head. 
An Engineer he fain would be, 
So he just draws. So let it be. 



EDGAR SPEER. 

Down from Pennsylvania came our Edgar 
Speer, 

Bound to be a hero all the time he's here, 

When he tried to play football got the ty- 
phoid bad, 

So they shipped him home to Mother, 
marked "Beware he's mad". 



49 





JUNE HOUSTON. 

What is so rare as a girl like June? 
For she works and also plays. 
She goes to the Arcade every night, 
But at "Lab.", spends all her days. 




logax Mcdonald. 

Oh tell us is Sycamore on the map, 

For until now we didn't care a rap, 

But since we know thai from there Logan 

hails, 
All other towns into most nothing pales. 



MALVIN REINHEIMER. 

Malvin is the big voiced man, 

The Junior Class Historian. 

He studies hard. 

Is quite a bard. 

And talks to whom-ever he can 



50 





GLADYS WATERS. 

Of her Juniors should be quite proud, 

And sing all her praises out loud. 

As a student she's it, 

With Professors a hit. 

In classes she's one of "the" crowd. 



EUGENE EVANS. 

Maxwell (ton) must be bonnie so it seems, 
For all the time about her, Eugene dreams. 
We hope the dreaming part will all be o'er, 
When "Nig" becomes Commandant of the 
Corps. 




DUFFY FLOYD. 

'Twas Force, they say, made Sunny Jim, 
Then Duffy ought to eat like him. 
For a permanent grouch is surely quite bad, 
And it makes all his loving companions sad. 



51 





RHEA W. WARDEN. 

Rhea an artist is they say, 
Though she does some writing every day. 
The pin she wears says Sigma Nu, 
Now tell me what this means to you. 




WALTER GASKINS. 

See this young man, who many hearts has 

broken. 
or this the many pins he wears are token. 
Howe'er we think thai Roma holds his 

heart. 
For when he visits her they never part. 



ALBERT KERN. 

Ye gods and little fishes in the brook, 
How oft we pray that this will get the hook. 
An orator or actorine he'd be, 
But when he tries, there's no one there to 
see. 



52 





MARGARET HOPWOOD. 

Margaret Hopwood, tall and stately, 
An artist of renown, 
She did some work for this very book, 
And she lives in Morgantown. 




LIEUTENANT WILLIAM S. WEEKS. 

Of the Law School is William S. Weeks. 
Best known to the Class when he speaks, 

When the Junior Laws struck, 

And then rah amuck, 
'Twas his toast that their memory seeks. 



CLYDE C. PUGH. 

This quiet young Junior named Pugh, 
Whose habits you better had view, 
Into business of other folks. 
His nose he never pokes, 
With that he has nothing to do. 



53 





JENNY BOUGHNER. 

Jenny is a quiet lass, 
And very loyal to her class, 
Whene'er a meeting is on hand, 
She is there to take her stand. 




ROBERT K. HATES. 

Another young Junior named Bates, 
Had a horror of making dates. 
Now he'd study law, 
Till Green monkeys he saw, 
But ever, "Sweet Woman" berates. 



L. J. BERNSTEIN. 

There once was an Editor man, 
Who writes as nobody else can. 
Tho he doesn't write verse, 
He does nothing worse. 
Among students he's up with the van. 



54 





NELL H. COX. 

This is Nell H. Cox, 

To whom men come in flocks. 

She studies sometimes, 

But more often one finds, 

Her engaged in most interesting talks. 




WALTER B. CROWL. 

Our Vice President's name is B. Crowl. 
For his office he made a big howl, 

In spite of h,is place, 

They sat on his face, 
And smothered his yells with a towel. 



FRANK B. LEWELLYN. 

Here is our Frank B. Lewellyn, 
Who never will get tired of tellin', 
"When Bryan was here, 
I was so near, 
I could hear all the voters a-yellin' 



55 






EDITH SMITH. 

Edith Smith so quiet and neat. 
Friendly to all whom she may meet. 
Like David and Jonathan of Bible fame, 
Are Leola and Edith, both Smith by name. 




MILTON I). FISHER. 

Milton the famous blind I'oet, 

Has nothing on Fisher we know it. 

Even talks in his sleep, 

With dignity deep, 
Thinks his office has nothing below it. 



JAMES HAWORTH. 

There once was a fellow called "Jum". 
Say music and he'll surely come. 

A It ho he can't sing. 

He can play anything, 
With his fingers, his toes and his thumb. 



56 





BEULAH PICKENPAUGH. 

Yes this is Beulah, 
Her other name ? Pickenpaugh. 
You say it's too long, 
Ay there is the rub. 
But her name might be Grubb. 




JOE K. GRUBB. 

There was a young person named Grubb, 
Who belonged to the "Old Timer's Club". 
Every night without fail. 
To the "Grand" he would trail. 
Just as certain as Monday's wash tub 



C. B. VAN BIBBER. 

A gallant young man is our "Cy", 
Whenever young ladies are nigh. 
If he chances to view, 
Someone that is new, 
For a place in her heart he will 



try. 



57 



M&i*Z 



>u* 






LEOLA SMITH. 

Do you think that it is fair, 

To be called Smith and have red hair ? 

But tho she's unlucky in such things as 

these, 
She is lucky in others, for if you please, 
She managed to pass, 
Withoul an exam in Beowulf class. 




WILLIAM F. HUNT. 

Laconic is William F. Hunt, 
lie doesn't say ten words a month, 
I le's tree from all guile, 
What In- says is worth while, 
Alt ho its is only a grunt. 



ALLEN I!. LAMBDIN. 

Our track team Captain's from Keyser, 
To beat him, takes an early riser. 

He is so fleet, 

He wins every meet. 
"I'll win it," he cries, "or I'll die Sir". 



:>s 





ft: * 



fj€ 



*£!$% 




HARRIET STEELE. 

There is a young woman named Steele, 
Who in Science can give a great spiel. 

She cuts up grasshoppers without a 
quiver, 

And frogs and cats without a shiver, 
But she can spiel in another strain, 
When Junior politics are to blame. 




WILLIAM G. LOUGH. 

It is quite a puzzle you know, 

To find a word to rhyme with Lough. 

It might rhyme with low, 

But I've been so slow, 
Perhaps we had best rhyme it with through. 



CULLIN G. MARTIN. 

I wonder what started this draught. 

Oh I see it's just Martin, he laughed. 
The breeze he creates, 
Blows away sure as Fates, 

Two men quite as big as Bill Tat't. 



59 





LENA CHARTERS. 

This is our Lena so dignified, 

Who walks the streets with stately stride. 

In Domestic Science she's a shark, 

And cooks the eats, at nightly larks. 




HOMER WALK!']'. 

Walkup's the fighter of our class. 
He licks 'cm singly, or "en masse". 

When the Sophomores showed finht, 

He foughl them all night, 
And threw one through the Greenhouse's 
Glass. 



ERNEST CONAWAY. 

"Buck" Conaway's a foot ball shark, 

In every way up to the mark. 

Thru eleven or twelve, 

His way he would delve, 

And murmur "Oh ray. what a lark". 



60 





MARSH WATKINS. 

Marsh Watkins the fellow who talks, 
About nine times as fast as he walks, 
When he breezes by, 
His trousers rolled high, 
'Tis then that you see "noisy" sox. 




JOHN B. WYATT. 

There was a young man named Wyatt, 
Very modest, demure and quiet. 
In law he is wise, 
But the big question lies, 
In getting our John to deny it. 



L. L. WILSON. 

L. Wilson's first name is Leitch, 
At base ball he sure is a peach, 

High balls or low, 

Fast ones or slow, 
There's nothing quite out of his reach. 



61 





JOHN L. DUNKLE. 

John Dunkle is a student too, 
Forgot more than some people knew. 
If someone has shirked, 
His problems not worked, 
John will work them all out P. D. Q. 




GEORGE COLEBANK. 

Colebank has a passion for work. 
He labors away like a Turk. 

He is so busy, 

He makes other folks dizzy, 
For he starts and he stops with a jerk. 



JOHN D. MAY. 

The pride of the Class is John May. 
He studies about ten hours a day. 

He's never erratic. 

He eats mathematics, 
The same way that cattle eat hay. 



Hi! 





MARVIN TAYLOR. 

His conduct has never been lax, 

As a student he's sharper than tacks. 

When asked who he is, 

The reply that is his, 
Is that he is a brother of Zach's. 




T. CLYDE PITZER. 

This learned young fellow named Pitzer, 
Is bubbling over with wit Sir. 

When he starts to poke, 

Fun at you for a joke, 
He aims for the mark and he hits her. 



CLAUDE C. SPIKER. 

If you ask me where he hails from. 

The reply is not concealed, 
He comes from Preston County, 

And the famous buckwheat fields 



63 





CLARENCE J. PRICKETT. 

Here's a young Doctor named Clarence, 
That he is a "Med" is apparent. 

When there's fun to be had, 
"Ten bones I need Dad," 
Is the message he sends to his parents. 




II. C. HUMPHREYS. 

Humphreys is just like Sunny Jim. 
Whenever you see him he gives you a grin. 
Even in class, — wear off? No, not it, 
Tho Deahl throws all others into a lit. 



E. R. BELL. 

One of these Juniors named Bell, 
Played football exceedingly well, 
He's Captain for next year. 
We've not the slightest fear. 
That of much else but winning we'll tell. 



(14 





JEROME K. HALL. 

The Profession of Law is his choice, 
For it has a persuasive voice. 
If he celebrates, 
When he wins his debates, 
He'll not do much else but rejoice. 




VAN W. GILSON. 

There was a young Junior named Van, 
Who was a Rhodes Scholarship man, 
To Oxford he'll go, 
With the last of the snow, 
Take more honors there if he can. 



E. S. LIVELY. 

This gallant young Junior, 'tis shocking, 
Has a passion, — with girls to go walking, 

While walking one day, 

Found, to his dismay, 
That the girl had a hole in her — hat. 



fi5 




JAMES KENNEDY. 

Goodlooking Kennedy, how he can dance, 
Till the girls of his choice, all stand in a 
trance. 
Bashful is Jim, 
So don't speak to him, 
For at talkative people, he will look 
askance. 



List, ye Students, In this college 
West Virginians, Hold and mighty 
If, at all, ye should desire 
.That to stories proud ye hearken; 
List then, to this tale of Juniors. 

In September, in the Fall Time. 
'Twas the year of Xiueteen-eight, then. 
Came there to this seat of learning 
Divers products of the High Schools, 
High Schools of our West Virginia. 

And these youths and fair young maidens. 
In the presence of our "Tommie'', 
Fearful of his show of power, 
Heard the words that they had hoped for, 
"Freshman Class, don't try to argue". 

And the lots of these young people, 

Noblest ones in West Virginia, 

So, withal, were cast together 

For the years that were approaching, 

For the grind to "cop" the "Sheepskin". 

Soon upon the field of battle. 
When opposed by Sophmores sturdy. 
Vindicated was their courage, 
Drove the foe from off the Campus, 
Chased them all the way to Swisher's. 

Then that Winter in athletics. 

Those same Freshman were triumphant. 

Victors were they o'er the Sophmores, 



O'er the Preps and likewise Juniors, 
Senior score, twelve — twenty-seven. 

Came again the gorgeous Autumn. 

Now, oui- Friends were called the Sophomores, 

Guided by the miner Osburn. 

Forged their way to greater honors; 

"'Stealthy Steve" Speer, stuck the posters. 

But upon the field of battle, 

To the foe were given over 

All the brave and valiant Sophmores, 

By the vetinary Lender. 

Pike the football Coach, Horse Doctor. 

But again they soon were rising, 
And 'twas in the happy Springtime, 
On the blue Monongahela, 
Hosts they were unto the Seniors, 
Greatest stunt of all the season. 

Now these youths are known as Juniors, 
Juniors, noble, strong, and mighty, 
•I. Van Buren Blair, the ehieftan. 
And these Juniors do aspire, 
By their deeds to win great honors. 

And this volume is a token. 
Of the power of these Juniors, 
Of the Juniors intellectual. 
Working onward to the next year. 
When by "Prexy" they shall dubbed be, 
Bachelors in their fields of learniner. 



67 




rain^ a\-Tevnoon 



•;x 



Sophomore Class 3\oll 



Allen, James Cornwall 
Amos, Curt Edgar 
Bachman, Carl George 
Baugher, Edward James 
Bobbitt, Ray Maxwell 
Bonar, Martin 
Cotrill, Delford Lee 
Dadisman, Samuel Houston 
Davis, Anna Beulah Christine 
Emory, Blanche Frances 
Goff, Eustace Thomas 
Grimm, Homer Willard 
Hamilton, Claude Dewis 
Heflin, Neal Minter 
Helling, Nellie May 
Hodges, Charles Edward 
Hoover, Ollie Foster 
Humes, Harry Oliver 
Johnson, Richard William 
Kennedy, James Edward 
Kirk, Jose de Almeida 
McConnell, Nellie Margaret 



McMinn, Vaun 

Mealy, Frederick Earle 

Miller, Alexander 

Philips, George Francis 

Purinton, Helen Elizabeth 

Reed, Bessie Jane 

Robinson, Charles Stillman 

Ryan, John Donald 

Shunk, Ivan Vaughan Detweiler 

Six, Lida Jane 

Skinner, Dean Cook 

Smith, Fred Manning 

Stealy, Louise 

Taylor, George Edward 

Taylor, Roscoe Shirley 

Tracy, Benjamin Franklin 

Vanderwort, John Paul 

Vass, Thurman Elroy 

Williams, Edgar 

Wardford, Alberta 

York, Jr., John Yannigan. 



70 




CHAPTER I. 

X THE LAST YEAE but one that Prexy the 
Prestonite was judge over Israel, the tribe 
of "Thirteen", came up into the land. They 
were the first among the Children of Israel 
to adopt and weai- the official Freshman Cap. 
And the Sophomores waxed strong in the land 
and fattened themselves on the substance 
thereof. 



2. And the tribe of "Thirteen" went out against the 
Sophomores, and overthrew them, and smote them hip and 
thigh even from the top of the Observatory Hill, unto the 
entering in of the gate at Mechanical Hall. 

:}. Then the tribe of "Thirteen" rejoiced, and made an 
image in the likeness of a Sophomore, and dragged it for a 



mockery before the children of Israel gathered on the Ath- 
letic Field. 

4. And it came to pass, when the Sophomores saw it. 
that they rose up for shame, and laid hold on the image, 
and rent it; and a part thereof was carried off by the tribe 
of "Thirteen", and a part by the Sophomores. 

.">. Xow it came to pass that the tribe of "Thirteen" 
sent eight strong men to lie in wait for the King of the 
Sophmores, and they did. And so they took him, and bound 
him with cords, and carried him afar off into the wilderness 
beyond West Morgantown, which no man knoweth. 

(i. Hut he brake his bonds after one night and returned. 
And the day of the (Mass Rush was at hand. 

7. And in thai day the tribe of "Thirteen" overthrew 
the Sophmores, in the presence of all the children of Israel. 



CHAPTER II. 



Now when the children of Israel gathered, after one 
year, before Prexie the judge and all the priests and doctors, 
the numbers of the tribe of "Thirteen" had wasted, and 
their strength was not the strength of yore. In those days 
the Freshmen were a scourge in the land. 

•_>. Then said the tribe of "Thirteen". "Although our 
strength he not -real, yet verily we will not permit that 
these Freshmen should waste the land and its substance. 

:',. So they gol up by uight, and weui forth againsl the 



Freshman Class, and took many, and shaved their heads, so 
that they were a shame and a reproach before the children 
of Israel. 

4. And in the day id' the Class Rush, because they had 
more of numbers to choose from, the Freshmen overthrew 
the tribe of "Thirteen", and gained the Victory. 

.1. Donald Ryan, 

Historian. 




73 



y resljmen Glass 5\oll 



Officers 

P. M. Conley President 

R. H. Gist Vice President 

H. H. Reynolds Secretary 

R. L. Hogg Treasurer 

Earl G. Kaltenbach Historian 



ttoll 



Abbott, F. L. 
Adams, J. R. 
Ash, I. O. 
Bailey, C. B. 
Raker, R. E. 
Barnett, Joseph 
Bell, Bessie 
Bierer, Joseph 
Brown, E. C. 
Brown, H. C. 
Brown, Iris 
Burdette, N. C. 
Burrell, L. G. 
Cady, Elizabeth 
Carter, Hoyd 
Casto, <'. C. 
Cook, Elizabeth 
<'o\, Wayne 
Deem, D. Mc. 
Deem, F. B. 
Dodd, 1). R. 
Dorsey, Henry 
Eagan, Fannie 
Feller, R. A. 



Fernandez, Eugene 
Finch, L. L. 
Fine, Reuben 
Fitzgerald, L. A. 
Frazier, P. G. 
Frye, A. L. 
Goodwin, S. K. 
Griffin, S. K. 
Grubb, J. K. 
Guseman, S;idie 
Hayhurst, Zelma I. 
Hearne, W. O. 
Herring, Eleanor 
Hogg, R. L. 
Holt, J. H., Jr. 
Hopkins, W. S. 
Jackson, G. A. 
Jennison, L. L. 
Jenkins, Jesse 
Jones, J. P. 
Kelly, S. A. 
Kerns, G. W. 
Kilgore, H. A. 
Lawrence, L. 1.. 



Lemley, F. L. 
Lodge, J. D. 
MacRae, J. A. 
Marr, H. B. 
Martin, T. M. 
McCrumm, H. B. 
Mclntyre, D. S. 
Meldahl, H. S. 
Morgan, M. F. 
Psaki, H. G. 
Reeves, Poscoe 
Rhodes, L. A. 
Riheldaffer. Win. 
Ross, Nellie May 
Sander, Christine 
Savage, F. C. 
Sell, W. O. 
Sheets, Lucy W. 
Shirkey, W. F. 
Shriver, F. O. 
Sloan. C. E. 
Smith, A. J. 
Smith, Ada W. 
Seehley, J. A. 



Stuart, Anna G. 
Sturgass, J. L. 
Sydenstricker, L. E. 
Teter, W. II. 
Teter, C. W. 
Thornhill, W. F. 
Tickle, T. G. 
Tuckwiller, E. A. 
Wanamaker, John 
Warrick, Gretchen 
Weltner, F. B. 
White, W. F. 
Whiting, W. F. 
Williams, G. F. 
Williams, Edgar 
Wilson, Adda Y. 
Winnette, Ethel 
Wright, Max 
Dorothy, X. C. 
Godrich, W. J. 
Johnson, W. W. 
McDonald, Brown 
Stanard, 0. H. 



74 



■r; * 



LIBRARY 



^JflP wt^ ^P^ ^0^ 



w^ 




■i>£ ^ 



%+ 









75 



'Let every man be judged according to his works. 




OLLOWING this ancient saying, I have the honor 
and pleasure of introducing to the University, 
and to the world at large, the Class of "1914"; 
and displaying its characteristic works and at- 
tainments. Never lias there been a better class 
in the history of the University. This I firmly 
believe, and have been told by upper classmen. 
On all occasions the Class of "1914" has il- 
luminated its fame. In the class-room it has at- 
tained wonders; it is represented in all the athletic exercises; 
on the 'Varsity football team, on the track team, on the Gym 
team, and all the other representations. The Freshmen have 
Striven hard to show the Faculty, and the students, that they 
are virtuous and honorable men. in every sense of the word. 
The Freshman Class stands now energetic and progres- 
sive, bowing only to the shrine of study and learning, the 
greal and powerful monarch of today. The only disturbance 



that has infuriated them was the attacks of the Sophs. On 
one occasion at meeting, a Freshman remarked: •'The Sophs 
ought to he wise enough to stay away from such a class as 
can's." True as that is. they were foolish enough to post 
signs, advertising for 10000 gallons of milk. On many oc- 
casions they were offered these 10000 gallons of milk, hut 
they always ran away when the offering was made. In the 
class rush, the milk soldiers suffered a most crushing defeat, 
and some of the gallant warriors saved barbers expenses for 
a few weeks. Under such a leader as Conley, the Class was 
hound to thrive, and so they did. After winniDg the rush. 
the period ef annoyance from the Sophs was over, and the 
"Yoke of Victory" has passed to the Freshmen, and now 
we stand, peaceful and mutually friendly, working for dear 
old West Virginia. We know that the Freshman Class is a. 
foundation of new life in the University, and with this object 
in view, we will work' long and heartily to make ourselves 
worthy of a name and some honor. KALTE. 




7t> 




micr 




Senior Caw Class 3\oll 

Officers 

„ 7 .. President 

John Benjamin W yatt 

«r-,,- T-- „ t^ ...Vice President 

Harrv William King, Jr 

Treasurer 

George Hutchinson Gunnoe 

TT , ... .Secretary 

Grover Foster Hedges 

, ■, ,, Historian 

Albert John Kern 

:aoii 

Ball, William Thomas Hinds, Holman Blaine 

Barncord, Norman Roland Hunter, Glenn 

Bock, Edward Sidney Ice, Lory Francis 

Bolin, Hand Alexander Kern, Albert John 

Bunner, Ezra Elsworth King, Harry William, Jr. 

Burnside, Guy Herman Mc.Clure, Lawrence Ledwith 

Dailey, Arthur Jerome Macklin, Ernest Walker 

Darby, Roy Clyde Poling, Herman J. 

Douthitt, Carl Czerny Powell, Groyer Cleveland 

Edwards, Levi Arthur Robinson, John Henry 

Evick, Walter Clifton Scaggs, Fisher F. 

Fletcher, William Cody Staata, Carter Williard 

Flournov. Samuel Lightfoot Straton, Joseph Butcher 

Gunnoe, George Hutchinson Vance, Joseph Butcher 

Hall, Jerome Venoir Wilkinson, John Benjamin, Jr. 

Hedges, Grover Foster Wyatt, John Benjamin 
Hensley, William Henry 



78 




79 




ROM time out of mind it has been decreed that a 
history of the Senior Law Class be included in 
the pages of this boob every time it appears be- 
fore an unsuspecting public. In pursuance of 
that mandate these lines are written. An 
apology is due to Herodotus and the same is 
hereby extended to the father of history; for 
this article parades under the title of "history" 
and still bears little resemblance to the orderly 
narrative style conceived to be one of the criteria of the 
chronicler's art. With these brief observations we may pro- 
ceed with some (if I lie facts of this most extraordinary class 
And now a word as to the officers of the class : At the 
head as president stands "Fatts" Wyatt, probably the most 
popular man in the University. A good likeness of "Fatts". 
as Johll B. is familiarly called by his many friends, can be 
seen mi about t'Vrry other page of this work. His election to 
I In- hie.li office was won without opposition and blushingly he 
wears this great honor. As he has made good as catcher on 
tin' Varsity team, so has he made good as the chief executive 
officer of this class; iii fact, "Fatts" makes good at whatever 
he turns his mind. 

Second in command of our ship of state is "Buck" King, 
he of Thespian proclivities and of the romantic art of min- 
strelsy. "Buck" stars in theatricals, foot-ball, and every- 
thing else to which his fancy turns, including the mysterious 
game of love; the latter can be subscribed to by many fair 
ones, and more particularly by a certain dream of femininity. 



"Buck" has the goods and never fails to make delivery at 
the psychological moment. 

Our secretary is genial (J rover Foster Hedges. Grover 
is bright in the law and I am not going to be so unkind as 
to say that he absorbs it in the library where he is an as- 
sistant. I am not going to mention the fact either that 
Grover is a. fine judge of chewing tobacco. However, as he 
is our scrivener, it might be necessary to use a little of the 
weed to be able to wet his pencil when the Weighty minutes 
are to be recorded; any way the favor of the doubt is to be 
given him. Under the direction of Miss Iledrick. .Air. Hedges 
has developed into a first class librarian and consequently 
knows a good deal of that large part of the practice of law, — 
where to find it. 

Next that sterling democrat "Red" Gunnoe, whose hair 
he assures us is the exact tint of the great statesman Thomas 
Jefferson. "Bed" is sometimes known as "Chancellor" 
Gunnoe, and inter alia "Johnny Red." We have now proba- 
bly established his identity clearly enough, any way the plea 
of misnomer avails little in our practice and we now present 
the indictment of Ibis second .leffersonian exponent of the 
party symbolized by the jackass. He is our treasurer. And 
a more trustworthy one would be hard to find: in view of his 
probity and integrity we did not deem it necessary to place 
him under bond conditioned upon bis faithful performance 
of his office. As an illustration of this faculty inherent in 
him we instance the following occurrence vouched for by 
reputable members of the Ananias Club, whose patron saint 



Ml 



is Roosedore Theovelt: It was a dark eLoudly night in winter; 
the hour was late, and the streets deserted; "Red" was re- 
turning home from a visit to the home of his sweetheart : 
the class funds were in his pocket; he passed a sequestered 
spot and was beset by a thief or robber, otherwise a high- 
wayman; at the command of halt. '"Red" halted, for he is a 
man of valor; at the command deliver over your cash "Red" 
showed fight, in which issue the robber joined ; the tight was 
worth going miles to see, but no one was there, save "Red" 
and the robber: finally the robber, being a more powerful 
man, physically, got "Red" down and rifled his pockets, 
finding three cents; the smallness of the loot exasperated the 
robber who exclaimed: "Why did you wrestle over a two 
acre lot to save three cents?" To this "Red" loyally re- 
joined: "I was not fighting to save the three cents, but to 
keep from revealing the financial condition of the Senior haw 
Class." In token of our appreciation of this heroric act the 
class unanimously awarded "Red" a Carnegie leather medal. 
"Red" is an embryonic great jurist and the State of West 
Virginia will hear from his later. 

Modesty forbids the historian from setting forth Hie at- 
tainments of tlie writer; but this hotchpot clearly reveals the 
state of his present mental condition and no bill need be filed. 

The faculty ought now to be criticised. It is always in 
order to do this, and everybody does it — from the Legislature 
down to the janitor, or rather from the Legislature up to the 
janitor. But in this instance it will be a kindly criticism. 
for it is to be doubted wmether there are any instructors in 
the entire University so well liked among the student body 
as the members of the law faculty. 

First, there is Dean Hogg. The Dean is the friend of 
all. and all the students are his friends. lie has carefully 
led us along the way of legal jurisprudence and indicated the 



principal milestones along the road, adverting our minds to 
the genius of our legal institutions and the foundations of 
our practice. We are all his debtors, and the heirs of his 
extensive learning. His reputation as a practical lawyer of 
wide experience, and the fact that he is the author of works 
on legal subjects accepted as high authority in our courts, 
makes him peculiarly fitted for the station he holds. 

Professor Willey. long a favorite with successive classes 
lost none of his prestige with the present class. His lectures 
on the branches assigned to him are always interesting and 
instructive and give the student an insight into the applica- 
tion and meaning of technical law. Professor Willey main- 
tains a hall of fame in which he has the pictures suitably 
framed of all the classes that have passed through the portals 
of the College of Law for years back, and the picture of the 
present class holds no mean place among them. .More stu- 
dents of the law have sat at the feet of Professor Willey than 
has been the case in regard to any other instructor in the 
State. Age however will no doubt cause his retirement with- 
in the next few years and it is a safe bet that it will be a long 
time before his peer is secured. The memory of Professor 
Willey will linger long in our recollections of the College of 
haw. 

Professor Trotter has had a large part in the shaping of 
our knowledge of the law. His methods differ from the other 
instructors, so as to give a pleasing variety to the means of 
wooing the jealous mistress of the law. He has the teaching 
ability highly developed and brings home the main issues of 
the courses over which he has charge. His pleasant manner 
make the student at home in his classes and smoothes the path 
when we awkwardly phrase and conceive the law. He realizes 
the limitations of the beginner in the law and does not insist 
on an unattainable result of a knowledge of all the law. 



81 



Professor Barnes did not meet us in his classes this year, all 
work under him having been completed prior thereto How- 
ever we had occasion in court practice and in the dove-taihngs 
^subjects to apply t*> good pu^^^^ 

viouslv imparted and thereby , -roved m part the work don< 
nmder his guidance to be of great value. 

ks Sedrick, the dainty mistress of the library served us 

XV( , U Srin! the year in directing our attention to the volume 

I , ,.,, ^recorded the evidence of the law. Also, she did not 

fail to remind us on occasion that a library is a place m which 

or ad ™d reflect, rather than a place to give utterance to 

Lerdieta and hilarity. While a little -strenuous in her , s- 

ei^line at times we all felt free to consult with her at any time 

wfth reference to the content of the library and always found 

her obliging and ready to assist. May she live long and prospa . 

Many events occurred during the year worthy of recording 

,„.;,. but time would fail me to relate them and your patience 

,; il(1 , ;; ot endlire it, gentle reader, so it shall not be attempted 

to tell all. The class observed all the regular holidays, of ocurse 

Then there were observed two or three extras. When Madame 

Schuman-Heinck struck town the class closed their hooks and 

ou t of respecl to the talent of this great vocalist a holiday was 

,,,.,.,„,,„, T h en the next day happened to he the one on whose 

eve the Military Ball was given. True to the spirit of appre- 
ciation of an event of so much importance socially the Law 

School deer 1 nothing .loin-, ami .1 was so. 1 hen Lincoln, 

,1,,. log-splitter and president, happened to be bom on the 
twelfth dav of February so we adjourned out oi respect to ins 
memory and yielded to the temptation to take a rest. On the 
fifteenth day of November Guy Burnside astounded us all by 
answering a question correctly on the first guess Teddy 
Bock the man that talks, missed a question on the next day, 



hut. fortunately the world did not come to an end after all. 
On February 6th Joe Gibson proposed that the class purchase 
for Professor Willey a dog to take the place of the late lamented 
"Bob", — motion unknown, as doe is not in the dog business. 
On the tenth day of November Charles Louchery gave a talk on 
stock dividends (for further information, see Charley). 

McOlure. the brainy little base-ball coach, is always right 
in his own judgment in opinions handed down by him. Strat- 
ton, the crack pitcher, is not quite so sure at all times, as to law, 

hut' he is h in baseball. Hall is the Blackstone of the class. 

Powell yielded to the charms of a talented girl and became 
a benedict during the year. Macklin is the story-teller. As to 
the biggest bluffer, point undecided, however Gibson, Vance, 
and Dailey favorably mentioned'. The orator. McGara. Ball is 
the dean of the class. Darby one of the pretty hoys. Barncord 
poses as a practitioner. Biggest liar. — candidates too numerous 
for a choice. Every member of the class deserved individual 
mention and should not he lumped in a class of "also-rans. " 
hut the printer says the type will not stand for any more of this 
dope so we desist. 

Probably no college in the university, nor any one class 
contains men of such a uniform quality of excellence as does 
the Senior Law Class of this year. The relations of the stu- 
dents one toward the other and the relations of the faculty to 
the students and vice-versa have been most cordial. We have 
all become friends each of every other, and the friendships thus 
formed will go through life with us. When the portals of the 
University close upon us as students and we go forth to do the 
work of men in the world we shall all carry pleasant memories 
id' the hours spent in the classrooms where we learned the first 
lessons of our professional careers. 

The Historian. 




S2 




LIBRARY 



IJuruor Caw (Llass 3\oll 



Officers 

H. L. Carney President 

Robert L. Bates Vice President 

Max Adams Secretary 

F. B. Morgan Treasurer 



3\oll 



Adams, Max 
Amos, Frank R. 
Bates, Robert L. 
Bell, E. R. 
Blair, J. V., Jr. 
Campbell, H. R. 
Carney, H. L. 
Caulfleld, L. P. 
Crawford, S. R. 
Conaway, Ernest 
Davis, G. G. 
Floyd, C. D. 
Flynn, J. W. 
FoltZ, Charles 
Gatewood, M. C. 



Hodges, A. B. 
Levy, Jay B. 
Montgomery, S. B. 
Morgan, F. B. 
Reed, S. R. 
Ritchie, C. W. 
Siegler, L. W. 
Smith, A. T. 
Smith, J. L. 
Straton, Joe T. 
Tyler, E. L. 
Van Bibber, C. B. 
YYatkins, M. M. 
Wilkinson, J. B., Jr. 
Johnson, W. W. 



K4 




85 




E NEVER HAD much chance to make any his- 
\X/ tory; there is only one thing we can do, and that 

is to lake holidays, and so we did. 

Abe Lincoln's birthday came around, un- 
noticed and unknown, until eight-thirty o'clock- 
mi the eventful day. At that time the Junior 
Law Class decided to have a holiday, and so one 
was declared. President Carney told Professor 
Trotter, much to that genial Prof.'s delight, that 

he i dn't stay for school. Then upon motion of Senator 

•■Sam" Montgomery, the Amicable Society of Rail Splitters 
was organized, and the procession sallied forth. Senator Satn 
headed the parade down street, all marching Lockstep to the 
tune of "Hail! Hail! the gang's all here." 

On. on. they marched, until the Post office was reached. 
There they stopped, and gave a cheer that made the welkin 
ring, i whatever thai is-. The parade wasn'1 enough, how- 
ever, to celebrate the momentous occasion, so a wagon was 

chartered, and re-christened, "The four-wheeled sel ler 

\V. V. 1'.. two mule power, and piloted by a "('11111111' son of 
Erin." 

I'p High Streel sailed the hark, with its cargo of young 
American manhood, lusty voiced orators, rising young attor 
neys. and Judge Wilkinson. On. over the heaving tracks and 
bricks they sped, and at last arrived within the hallow.nl 
precincts of our Alma Mater. "Round the circle", was the 
slogan and round the circle was tin' fact. In front of Wood- 



burn Hall the Law School yell burst forth, and cheers for 
the Profs, reverberated, ami thundered aboul the Halls 0!' 
mystic learning Cheered upon their way by the smiling 
lace of Professor Trotter, the Bucaneers continued their raid. 
'"What ho! Who is this.' 'Tis Professor Denhl beating it for 
the President's Office." So they cheered Professor Deahl, 
once, twice, three times, but all for nought. He fled in rage 
to the sanctuary of President Purinton. Of course Prexy 
came in for his share of the cheering, hut would not appear 

The cruise was soon resinned and hack down the street 
sailed the craft, and finally made port in the friendly haven 
of Friend's Studio. There the photograph of the vessel and 
eicw was taken, with Professor Willey's house as a back- 
ground. 

Then the inland march began. Exhorted by a speech 
from Senator Sam. the citadel of the Boston Confectionary 
Store was stormed, and a single captive was taken, in the 
person of "Pat" Wyatt. "Fat", throned upon Hill Pros 
big tooth, made a speech. 

"Fellow citizens and Kail Splitters" said he. "This is a 
moment of "real occasion. It is fitting thai we made a burnt 
offering to the founder of our memory. Give me a cigarette." 

Then the angry mob went on. "Happy thought'', i'vrr 
drinks on George. Everybody filed into Comuntzis' and the 
\'vrf drinks were served. Lieutenant Weeks acting as toast- 
niaster. The toast— , ask him. Then they met Everel Casto 
Castie refused to make a speech, hut offered to set 'em up to 



8G 



the duck pins, and so it was. The Juniors bowled the Seniors. 
Xo one knows who won, for Cy Van Bibber got thirsty, and 
off they went, hot-foot, for Hello Bill Ream's, after another 
free coke. On the way '"Fat" Wyatt got mad, raving mad. 
He did so want a smoke, so Charley Phillips came to the 
rescue with cigars, real cigars, the first they'd had since the 
election. That was merely a diversion, and on they went to 
Ream's. Senator Sam gave the toast over the cokes, and 
then Ted Arthur wanted to pay for them. 

Cy was still thirsty and beat it for the Boston, with the 



mob at his heels. The Boston man tried to beg off with a 
few blotters, but there was no chance. They asked for candy, 
and he weighed it out, two cents worth to the man. Cy how- 
ever was an insurgent, and demanded a coke, he got it and 
was satisfied. 

Buck King was hungry, it was twelve o'clock. Up to the 
Peabody streamed the gang, but dinner wasn't ready and the 
doors were locked. So with an aching void where their din- 
ners should have been, the Amicable Society of Rail Splitters 
adjourned. — Watkins. 




Weight of Authority. 



87 



J*n ptemoriam 



RUDOLPH MUIMK 

LAW, 1 1 




THE "AMICABLE SOCIETY OF RAIL SPLITTERS" 



89 










^y^m 



90 









^t-vps 



91 




WAITING FOR JUNIOR WEEK 



92 




93 




»4 




Ttis. *rir///o?? ^>A<tG>/r£ 



95 




SOPHOMORE BOAT HIDE 




llmS_ 



W. & J. GAME 

97 







JUNIOR PICNIC 
98 



ft. ¥ 




JUNIOR "PROM." 




100 



THE FIRST PAN HELLENIC DANCE. 

The Pan Hellenic Organization gave their first Dance 
on Friday, September the thirtieth, Nineteen hundred and 
ten, at Phillip's hall. The hall was crowded with seventy- 
five couples, who enjoyed the dancing despite the hot weath- 
er, and despite the fact that they had to dodge one another. 
This was the first social event of the school year, and every- 
body was glad to get back into the 'Varsity "doin's" again. 
Many how-do-you-do's were exchanged during the evening. 
The patronesses were Mistresses Casto, MacLane, McKeel, 
Knowlton, MacNeil, Cooke and Zevely; they too seemed to 
participate in the general good time. The music was fur 
aished bv "Johnny" Jones. 



THE Y. W. AND Y. M. ('. A. RECEPTIONS. 

On Saturday night, October the eighth, nineteen hun- 
dred and ten, a large reception was given at the Armory, 
by the young women's and young men's Christian associa- 
tions, in honor of the new students. On the receiving line 
were Dr. and Mrs. Purinton, Mr. and Mrs. Simons, Messrs. 
G. W. Grow. Glen Hunter, George Viewig, and Clay Amos. 
and Misses Helen Del Jerry, Eva Fling, Bessie Reed, June 
Houston and Gladys Waters. Miss Wiestling, and Mr. Claj 
D. Amos had charge of the delicious refreshments. 

The Fall term of 1910, brought the delightful military 
hops back again. The firsl one of these was given on Friday 
evening, November the third, nineteen hundred and ten at 
the Armory. An unusually large crowd attended, including 
many of the faculty. The patronesses were Mrs. Lieutenent 
Weeks, Mrs. MacNeil. Mrs. E. M. Grant, Mrs. Everett Casto. 
Mrs. Zevely. Delicious punch and ice was served during the 
evening'. The music was furnished bv the Cadet band. Many 



people outside of the University were included among the 
invited guests of the military department. 



THE TIIETA NT EPSILON DANCE. 

On Friday night, December the second, nineteen hun- 
dred and ten, one of I he most enjoyable dances of the year, 
was given by the Theta Nu Epsilon fraternity at Phillips 
hall. The hall was decorated in an effective combination of 
green and black, the fraternity colors. The music was fur- 
nished by the Cadenza orchestra of Clarksburg. A delicious 
lunch was served during the intermission. The patronesses 
of the occasion were Mrs. Everett Casto, Mrs. Harry Zevely. 
Mrs. Gilbert Miller. Mrs. C. Edmund Neil, and Mrs John 
N. Simpson. About fifty couples of the Theta Nu Epsilon 
fraternity were present and a representative of each of the 
Fraternities in town. The dance committee was composed of 
Messrs. Charles Louchery, John McGill, and Boyd Smith. 
The official decorator was Lawrence L. McClure. 



THE WOMAN'S LEAGUE. AND Y. W. C. A. 
RECEPTIONS. 

The Young Woman's Christian association, and Wo- 
man's League gave a formal reception at the President's 
House, on Saturday evening. February eleventh, nineteen 
hundred and eleven. Those on the receiving line were Mrs. 
I). B. Purinton. and Misses Helen DeBerry, Pearl Compton, 
Leola Smith. Lida Six. Bessie Reed, Eva Fling, dune Houston. 
Gladys Waters and Helen Wiestling. The guests were usher 
ed To the dining room by Mistress A. W. Chez, and Miss 
Clara Clifford, where they were served with delicious re 
freshments bv Misses I>ess Ileiskell. Helen Purinton. Clara 



Dickason, Louise Stealey, Lena Chartres, and Iris Brown 
The favors, small hows of old gold and blue ribbon, were 
given by Mrs. Weeks and Mrs. Brinsmade. 



THE MILITARY BALL. 

The climax of Morgantown's social season was the Mili- 
tary Ball. It was the first given under the direction of Lieu- 
tenant Weeks. I'. S. A. Many people have well said that it 
surpassed all previous ones. One distinguishing feature was 
the great number of out of town guests, and the unusually 
small Dumber of Morgantown people who attended. 

Lieutenant Weeks and his Committee made an especial 
success of the decorations. The color scheme was old gold 
and blue, with white electric lights draped from a large 
electric wheel which was in the center of the ceiling, to all 
parts of the room, with the exception of the small space 
directly in front of the balcony. This space was left so that 
the spectators tnighl see the dancers. As a whole the decora- 
tions and drapings from the ceiling, had the effect of a blue 
and gold sky. with small stars twinkling here and thee . 
The balcony, along the west side of the hall and over the en- 
trance, was trimmed with red. white, and blue hunting, with 
the Corps colors as a center. Red lights illuminated this 
part of the Armory. Prom the balcony was unfurled a large 
American flag, during the twelfth dance, for which "The 
American Patrol", wis played. During this dance all the 
lights were extinguished, except a small cluster over the 



orchestra. On the north wall was a picture of George Wash- 
ington, and on the south wall was a picture of the Governor, 
W. E. Glasscock. Both of there were framed with electric 
lights and draped with the national colors. On the east wall, 
forming the center of decorations on that side of the Armory, 
was a large star, trimmed with electric lights set in an old 
gold and 1 lue background. In the center of the floor Ket- 
tering's orchestra from Grecnslmrg. Pa., was partly con- 
cealed, on a platform decorated with palms, southern smilax. 
and chrysanthemums. 

The reception was held from eight-thirty until nine-fif- 
teen. Then began the Grand March, led by Lieutenant 
Weeks and Mrs. Weeks. The program consisted of twenty- 
four dances and four extras. During the intermission, be- 
tween the tenth and eleventh dances, delicious refreshments 
were <.e>yed by Caterer Ziegenfelder of Wheeling. Ices were 
served throughout the evening. 

The receiving line was formed by the patronesses and 
the officers of the Corps, who constituted the committee on 
arrangements. They were Lieutenant and Mrs. W. S. 
Weeks. .Airs. Waitman Barbe. Cadet Captain Claude S. Tet- 
rick, Airs. Louis Black. Cadet Captain Neal P. Heflin, Mrs. 
John II. Cox, Cadet First Lieutenant Prank Sanders, Mrs. 
John B. Grumbein, Cadet Second Lieutenant .John Allen. 
Mrs. Bert II. Ilite. Cadet Corporal Robert P. Bates. Mrs. 
Charles E. Hogg, Cadet Private Bernard \V. Schenerlein. 
Mrs. William -I. Leonard. Cadet Private Robert M. Stride 
ler. Mrs. Daniel B. Purinton. Cadet Private Joseph Bierer. 
and Mrs. Prank B. Trotter. 




45- 
5( 



6 





.ytciV-tiw 



Sft 



ty-W^y. 



$MM EMm 



101 



3unior -P r ° m (Tommittee 

EDGAR B. SHEER— Chairman 
CLARKE POOL 
CLYDE PUGH 
ALBERT KERN 
T. W. CRAWFORD 



jpan-Tftellenic JDance (Tommittee 



Senior Week Committee 



HERMAN POCOCK— Chairman 
L. W. RYAN 
C. C. BURRITT 



KEMPER LITTLEP AGE— Chairman 
CLARA DICKASON 
C. W. LOUGH 



102 




m 



103 



°\ 







,3\ >. 



■J 
J 
■J 



0KW 










TtyiTftappajpsi 

Founded at Jefferson College, 1858 

COLORS 

Pink and Lavender 

FLOWER 
Sweet Pea 



J 05 



West Virginia .Alpfya Chapter 



Established May 23, 1890 



Fratres in Urbe 



Reverend A. M. Buchanan 
Gilbert B. Miller 
Joseph K. Buchanan 



Forest W. Stemple 
Robert Hennen 



Fratres in Facultate 



Frederick Wilson Truscott 
William Patrick Willey 
Lloyd Lowndes Friend. 
Madison Statliers 



James Russell Trotter 
Clyde E. Watson 
Enoch Howard Vickers 



Fratres in Universitate 
1911 



Arthur Brown Hodges 
David Bright Reger 

Joseph V. Gibson 
Clark Frances Pool 
Thomas Wilmer Crawford 
John James Kennedy 
Leo P. Caulfield 



George R. Jackson 
George Phillips 
John M. McGill 



1912 



1913 



1914 



Noel P. Weaver 



Robert Sidney Reed 



James Lewis Caldwell 
Frank B. Llewellyn 
Thomas Roach McMinn 
George Bowers Vieweg 
Herbert L. Carney 



Charles E. Hodges 
James Edward Kennedy 



Fred P. Weltner 



106 






5\oll of Active Chapters 



Washington and Jefferson College 
Bucknell University 
Dickinson College 
LaFayette College 
Swarthmore College 
Amherst College 
Cornell University 
Columbia University 
Johns Hopkins University 
University of Virginia 
West Virginia University 
Vanderbilt University 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Ohio State University 
University of Indiana 
University of Illinois 
Northwestern University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Minnesota 
University of Kansas 
University of Missouri 



Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

Case School of Applied Science 

Allegheny College 

Gettysburg College 

Franklin and Marshall College 

University of Pennsylvania 

Dartmouth College 

Brown University 

Syracuse University 

Colgate University 

Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 

Washington and Lee University 

University of Mississippi 

University of Texas 

Wittenberg University 

De Pauw University 

University of Chicago 

University of Michigan 

Beloit College 

University of Iowa 

University of Nebraska 



ins 



w - V*. 



Un 'VE . 



U 8Rary 



MTV 




431)1 Si^ma Iftappa 

Founded 1873 

COLORS 

Silver and Magenta 



109 



Delta Chapter 



Established February 24, 1891 



Fratres in Urbe 



Walter Haines South 
Arthur Lee Boyers 
Terrence David Stewart 
Theophilus Sutton Boyd 
David Campbell Garrison 
Cassius M. Lemlev 



David Chadwick Reay 
Edgar Stewart 
William Mount Sivey 
Prescott C. White 
Robert W. Fisher 
Frank S. Bowman 



Fratres in Facultate 



James Henry Stewart 
Russell Love Morris 
Frank Bateson Kunst 
Benjamin Walter King 



Clement Ross Jones 
John Behney Grumbein 
Dennis Martin Willis 



Fratres in Universitate 
1911 



Walter Logan Pipes 



James Harrison Kiddle 
Grover Foster Hedges 
Walter Wesley Gaskins 
Thomas Clyde Pitzer 



Carl George Bachman 
Claude Dewis Hamilton 



Glenn Foster Williams 
clay Clayton Casto 



1912 



1913 



1914 



George Truman Twvford 



Jackson Van Buren Blair, Ji 
Fdward Duvall Bromly 
Van Wagener Gilson 



Harold Burl Marr 
William Goff 



Eugene Chalmers Hammond 
James Henderson Cole 



110 




Ill 



3\oll of .Active (Tl)ap ters 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Union University 

Cornell University 

West Virginia University 

Yale University 

College of the City of New York 

University of Maryland 

Columbia University 

Stephens Institute of Technology 

Pennsylvania State College 

George Washington University 

Lehigh University 



St. Lawrence University 
Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 
Franklin and Marshall College 
Queen's College (Canada) 
St. John's College 
Dartmouth College 
Brown University 
Swarthmore College 
Williams College 
University of Virginia 
University of California 
University of Pennsylvania 



-Alumni (Tlubs 

New York Club Boston Club 

Albany Club Connecticut Club 

Southern Club Morgantown Club 

Philadelphia Club 



112 










-V 






*"•"• «■"'*« 



Sigma (Ll)i 

Founded at Miami University, Ohio, 1855 

COLORS 

Old Gold and Sky Blue 

FLOWER 
White Rose 



113 



yttu yttn (Tbapter 



Established May 18, 1895 



Fratres in Urbe 



George MacLaren Bryden 
Charles Everett Casto 
Boaz Baxter Cox 
Joseph Henry McDermott 
John Alden Purinton 
Howard Lewellyn Swisher 
John F. Tait 



Michel Eugene Forman 
Justin M. Kemble 
William Pearle McCue 
Paul Herman Martin 
John Hoffman Schifler 
Alexander Gordon Tait 
John Arndt Mount 



Fratres in Facultate 

Frederick Lawrence Kortwright C. Edmund Neil 

Lona Dennis Arnett 

Fratres in Universitate 

1911 



Richard Jay Gould 
Stanley Rhey Cox 
Burrell Kemp Eittlepage 

Massie Cameron Gatewood 
Frank Rezin Amos 



1911 



Charles William Louchery 
Ralph Thomas Thayer 



Corwin Sage Burns 
George Marion Osburn 



Wayne Cox 

Bernard Wallace Schenerlein 
Basil Spurloek Burgess 
William Forrest While 



1913 



1914 



Archie Boyd Carfer 
Alexander Campbell Osburn 
Stephen Paul Hoskins 



114 



3\oll of Chapters 






tg.** 4 * 



First Province 

Pennsylvania College 
Bucknell University 
Dickinson College 
LaFayette College 
Lehigh University 
Pennsylvania State College 
University of Pittsburg 
University of Pennsylvania 

Second Province 
University of Virginia 
George Washington University 
Washington and Lee University 

Third Province 
West Virginia University 
University of Cincinnati 
University of Michigan 
Case School of Applied Science 
Western Reserve University 
Albion College 
Ohio State University 
Missouri University 
University of Wooster 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Dennison University 



Fourth Province 

Indiana University 
De Pauw University 
Butler College 
Hanover College 
Purdue University 
Wabash College 

Fifth Province 

Northwestern University 
Beloit College 

Illinois Wesleyan University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Minnesota 
University of North Dakota 
University of Illinois 
University of Chicago 

Sixth Province 

University of Nebraska 
State University of Iowa 
University of Kansas 
Colorado College 
University of Missouri 
Washington University 



Seventh Province 
State University of Kentucky 
Central University of Kentucky 
Vanderbilt University 



Eighth Province 

University of California 
University of Southern California 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
University of Montana 
University of Utah 
University of Washington 



Ninth Province 

Syracuse University 

University of Maine 

University of Columbia 

Dartmouth College 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 

Cornell University 

llobart College 



Tenth Province 

University of Mississippi 
University of Texas 
Tulane University 
University of Arkansas 

in; 



Us Kahy 



^RSITY 




Founded at University of Pennsylvania, 1850 



COLORS 
Old Gold and Black 



117 



.Atpfya (Bamma Chapter 

Established 1896 

Fratres in Urbe 

Edward Miller Grant Ray V. Hennen 

John Gilmore Ross David Hott, Jr. 

Harry John Zevely Edward Gregg Donley 

Theodore Joseph Arthur Samuel Grove Chadwick, Jr. 

John Leisure Hatfield Charles William Held 

Charles James Hogg Lewis Dunn Beall (Delta) 

Fratres in Facultate 
Dean Charles Edgar Hogg Thomas Bond Foulk 

Fratres in Universitate 

1911 

Irving Hayne Moran Glenn Hunter 

John Henry Robinson George Harold Cummins 

John Benjamin Wilkinson, Jr. 

1912 
Clyde Charles Pugh Miflin Marsh Watkins 

Harry William King, Jr. 

1913 

Eric Foulk John Howard Holt, Jr. 

Stephen Rowan Crawford Marl Keenan 

1914 
Robert Hogg 

Special 

Donald McGillivray Henry Wood Thrasher 



118 



3\oll of Active diopters 



University of Pennsylvania 
Washington and Jefferson College 
Dickinson College 
Franklin and Marshall College 
University of Virginia 
Columbia University 
Tulane University 
University of Illinois 
Randolph-Macon College 
Richmond College 
Pennsylvania State College 
Washington and Lee University 
West Virginia University 



University of Maine 
Armour Institute of Technology 
University of Maryland 
University of Wisconsin 
Vanderbilt University 
University of Alabama 
University of California 
Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 
Georgia School of Technology 
Purdue University 
University of Michigan 
University of Chicago 
Northwestern University 



120 



Iftctppa .ALplja 

I SOUTHERN] 
Founded at Washington and Lee University, 1865 



COLORS 
Crimson and Old Gold 

FLOWER 
Red Rose and Magnolia 



121 



^Alplja 3\l)0 <TI)apter 



Established March 10, 1897 



Fratres in Urbe 



Dell Roy Richards 
William J. Snee 
Altha Warraan 
James Rogers Moreland 



Leroy Taylor 
Thomas Ray Dille 
Thomas Edward Hodges 



Fratres in Facultate 
Aretas Wilbur Nolan Robert Allen Armstrong 

Fratres in Universitate 
1911 



Charles George Baker 
Hu Swisher Vandervort 



Otto Dale Elson 
James Rogers Haworth 

James Cornwall Allen 



John Paul Vandervort 
Emory Ledrew Tyler 
William Lloyd Linton 



1912 



1913 



1914 



Edward Curtis Oldham 
James Evans Dille 



Walter Beryl Crowl 
Cyrus Biggs Van Bibber 



Richard Roeder Kellar 



Harold Bliss McCrum 
George Garrett Davis 
John Dalton Courtney 



122 



3\oll of .Active Chapters 



Washington and Lee University 

University of Georgia 

Wofford College 

Emory College 

Pandolph-Macon College 

Richmond College 

University of Kentucky 

Mercer University 

University of Virginia 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

Southwestern Univ. Georgetown, Tex. 

University of Texas 

Universty of Tennessee 

Davidson College 

University of North Carolina 

Southwestern Univ. Greensboro, Ala. 

Vanderbilt University 

Tulane University 

Central University of Kentucky 

University of the South 

University of Alabama 

Louisiana State University 

William Jewell College 

William and Mary College 



Westminster College 
Transylvania University 
Kentucky University 
University of Missouri 
Johns Hopkins University 
Millsaps College 
George Washington University 
University of California 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
University of Arkansas 
Georgia School of Technology 
West Virginia University 
Hampden-Sidney College 
University of Mississippi 
Trinity College 

North Carolina A. & M. College 
Missouri School of Mines 
Bethany College 
College of Charleston 
Georgetown College 
University of Florida 
University of Oklahoma 
Washington University 
Drury College 



124 



iMta Oau JDelta 

Founded 1859 

COLORS 
Purple, White and Gold 

FLOWER 
Pansy 



125 



©ammaTDelta diopter 



Established May 24, 1900 



Fratres in Urbe 



George C. Sturgiss (Delta Prime) 
Joseph Moreland (Gamma) 
James L. Calliard (Kappa ) 
Frank P. Corbin 



Simeon Smith (Beta Mu) 



Moses Stark Donnelly 

Clay Dille Amos 

Guy Herman Burnside 



Joseph Krouse Grnbb 
Charles Duffy Floyd 



John Lorentz Smith 



John Ross Adams 
Jett Lambert Smith 
Fred Luther Abbott 



Willey S. John 
Paul L. McKeel 
Raymond Kerr 
Carl Crawford (Gamma Lambda) 



Fratres in Facultate 



1911 



Bernard Lee Hutchinson 
Edward Sidney Bock 
Carl C. Douthatt 

1912 

Edgar Boyle Speer 
IOrnest Roy Bell 

1913 

James Thomas Brennan 
1914 

Robert Mann Strickler 
Harley Martin Kilgore 
William Francis Thornhill 



12fi 






3\olt of Active Chapters 



Southern Division 

Vanderbilt University 
University of Mississippi 
Washington and Lee University 
Emory College 
University of the South 
University of Virginia 
Tulane University 
George Washington University 
University of Texas 

Western Division 

University of Iowa 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Minnesota 
University of Colorado 
Northwestern University 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
University of Nebraska 
University of Illinois 



University of California 
University of Chicago 
Armour Institute of Technology 
Baker University 
University of Missouri 
University of Washington 

Northern Division 

Ohio University 
University of Michigan 
Albion College 
Western Reserve 
Hillsdale College 
Indiana University 
De Pauw University 
University of Indianapolis 
Ohio State University 
Wabash College 
Wooster University 
West Virginia University 
Purdue University 



Ohio Wesleyan University 
Kenyon College 
University of Cincinnati 

Eastern Division 

Allegheny College 

Washington and Jefferson College 

LaFayette College 

Stevens Institute of Technology 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

University of Pennsylvania 

Lehigh University 

Tufts College 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technology 

Cornell University 

Brown University 

Dartmouth College 

Columbia University 

Wesleyan University 

University of Maine 



128 







■UBln 



t/fVj 



3kta Ol)*ta 43i 

Founded at Miami University, 1839 

COLORS 

Light Shade of Blue and Pink 

FLOWER 
Pink Rose 



129 



West Virginia !fteta fisi Chapter 



Established September 15, 19C9 
Fratres in Urbe 



Fred C. Flenniken 

R. C. Price 

W. H. Kendrick 



A. W. Lorentz 
('. K. Jenness 



Fratres in Facultate 
Albert Moore Reese Waitman T. Barbe 

Fratres in Universitate 
1911 



Lory Francis Ice 
Harry Lucas Campbell 

Rocsoe Parriot Posten 

John Yanigan York, Jr. 
Roscoe Reeves 

Wilbur Fiske Shirkey 
Nathan Clarkson Burdette 
Charles Wilson Teter 



1912 



1913 



1914 



Clark Culbertson Burritt 
Arthur Jerome Daily 

Lewis Leitch Wilson 
Dwight Hall Teter 



Horace Simpson Meldahl 
Stanley Bruce Wilson 



i::o 



3\oll of .Active Chapters 



Amherst 

Boston 

Bowdoin 

Brown 

Dartmouth 

Maine 

Columbia 

Rutgers 

Stevens 

Wesleyan 

Yale 

Davidson 

Hampden-Sidney 

North Carolina 

Virginia 

Central 

Texas 

Missouri 

Oklahoma 

Washington 

Westminster 

California 

Stanford 



Colgate 

Cornell 

St. Lawrence 

Syracuse 

Toronto 

Union 

Dickinson 

Johns Hopkins 

Kenyon 

Ohio Wesleyan 

Vanderbilt 

Bethany 

Cincinnati 

Miami 

Ohio University 

Ohio State 

West Virginia 

Beloit 

Washington State 

Chicago 

Illinois 

Knox 

Michigan 



Western Reserve 
Wooster 
De Pauw 
Hanover 
Indiana 
Purdue 
Wabash 
Lehigh 
Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State College 
Washington & Jefferson 
Wittenberg 
Case 
Colorado 
Denver 
Kansas 
Northwestern 
Wisconsin 
Iowa 

Iowa State 
Iowa Wesleyan 
Nebraska 
Dennison 



132 




=Jl|,]i~-5 w.—» 1- ta»iff^; ** ,i fill 






Sigma flty Cpsiloit 

Founded at Richmond College, Virginia, 1901 

COLORS 
Purple and Red 

FLOWER 
Red Rose and Violet 



133 



(bamma !&eta Chapter 



Fratres in Urbe 



George Washington Price 
Gaylord Dent 



Ernest Claude Pixler 
Guy Baxter Hartley 



Charles Moon 



Fratres in Facilitate 

Fratres in Universitate 
1911 



Herman Diedler Pocock 



Alexander Deacon Bell 
John Benjamin Wyatt 
Albert John Kern 
Harry Grove Wheat 



Benjamin Franklin Tracy 



Irvin Oda Ash 
Joseph Bierer 



Rudolph Munk 



1912 



Blake Taylor 
Marvin Lucius Taylor 
Claude Spray Tetrick 
George Walter Grow 



1913 



1914 



Earl George Kaltenbach 
Edgar Frank Heiskell 



134 



i i » v* 



■ *:% 



> t ■ 



tffik* 



3\oll of Active diopters 



Richmond College 
West Virginia University 
Jefferson Medical College 
University of Pittsburg 
University of Illinois 
University of Colorado 
University of Pennsylvania 
William and Mary College 
North Carolina College of Agricul- 
ture and Mechanical Arts 
Ohio Northern University 
Purdue University 
Washington and Lee University 



Randolph-Macon College 
Georgia School Technology 
Delaware College 
University of Virginia 
University of Arkansas 
Lehigh University 
Virginia Military Institute 
Ohio State University 
Norwich University 
Alabama Polytechnic Intsitute 
Trinity College 
Dartmouth College 
George Washington University 



Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Norfolk, Virginia 



136 







mvE R ; 



Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1869 

COLORS 
Black, White and Gold 

FLOWER 
The White Rose 



137 



(Bamma $\)i (Tljapter 

Established February 24, 1891 
Fratres in Urbe 



Franklin Marion Brand 
Arthur Lucas 
Raymond E. Clark 



Henry Maxwell Schrader 
Robert Green 



J. D. Garrison 



Fratres in Facultate 

Fratres in Universitate 
1911 



F. Willard Steele 
Lonnie Watterson Ryan 
Edward H. Beardsley 

Gearge H. Colebank 
Logan McDonald 
Fred Bruce Morgan 

Frederick Earl Mealey 



J. Paul Jones 
Russell H. Gist 
Brown McDonald 



1912 



1913 



1914 



Harry Cooper Stulting 
J. D. Garrison 



Claude C. Spiker 

R. L. Bates 

H. C. Humphreys 



Lloyd C. Gibson 



Landon T. Reynolds 
Lewis Boiling Rhodes 



i::s 



5\oll of .Active diopters 



University of Virginia 

University of Georgia 

University of Alabama 

Howard College 

North Georgia Agricultural College 

Washington & Lee Univeristy 

Bethany College 

Mercer University 

University of Kansas 

Emery College 

Lehigh College 

University of Missouri 

Vanderbilt Univeristy 

University of Texas 

Louisiana State University 

Cornell College 

Georgia School of Technology 

University of Washington 

Northwestern University 

University of Vermont 

Stephens Institute of Technology 

University of Colorado 



Uinversity of Wisconsin 
University of Illinois 
University of Michigan 
Missouri Schools of M. & M. 
Washington University 
West Virginia University 
Dartmouth College 
Western Reserve University 
University of Nebraska 
Washington State University 
University of North Carolina 
Tulane University 
DePauw University 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Purdue University 
Ohio State University 
Leland Stanford University 
Lombard University 
Indiana University 
Mount Union College 
Univeristy of California 
University of Iowa 



Williams Jewell College 

Carolina College of Agriculture and 

Mechanical Arts 
Rose Polytechnic Institute 
Albion College 
LaFayette College 
University of Oregon 
Colorado School of Mines 
Cornell University 
State College of Ketnucky 
University of Chicago 
Iowa State College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Arkansas 
University of Montana 
Syracuse University 
Case School of Applied Science 
University of Pennsylvania 
Pennsylvania State College 
Virginia Military Institute 
Oklahoma University 



140 



Oljeta yt\i Cpsilon 

Founded at Wesleyan University, 1876 



COLORS 

Green and Black 



141 



Otyeta Oljeta (Tfyapter 



Fratres in Urbe 



Justin M. Kimble 
Harry John Zevely 
Gilbert Benton Miller 
Robert Cole Price 



C. Edmund Neil 



Charles Everett Casto 
Albert Ford Dickey 
Charles A. Fowler 

Fratres in Facultate 

John Nathan Simpson 

Fratres in Universitate 



John Lee Core 

Charles William Louchery 

Kalph Thomas Thayer 

John McGill 

John Benjamin Wyatt 

Jackson VanBuren Blair 

Lonnie Watterson Ryan 

Basil S. Burgess 

J. Clyde Kinsey 

James Rogers Haworth 

Lory Francis Ice 



Boyd Milford Smith 
Burrell Kemp Littlepage 
Richard Jay Gould 
Clark Francis Pool 
Edward Henry Beardsley 
David Harman Kahn 
Stanley Cox 
Herman Deidler Pocock 
Landon T. Reynolds 
Lewis Leitch Wilson 
L. L. McClure 



142 




144 



Founded at Columbia University, 1878 

COLORS 
Scarlet and Gray 

FLOWER 
Red Carnation 



145 



West Virginia Xi (Tkapter 

Established November 16, 1908 
Fratres in Facultate 



Dr. John Sheldon 

Dr. Frederick L. Kortwright 



Dr. Albert M. Reese 
Dr. Clvde E. Watson 



Homer A. L. Walkup 

Harry F. Coffman 
Thomas F. E. Bess 
Thurman E. Vass 

John A. Sanders 
Thomas G. Tickle 



Fratres in Universitate 
1912 

Clarence J. Prickett 
1913 

Eustace T. Goff 
Ray M. Bobbitt 
Constantine G. Psaki 



1914 
1915 



William O. Hearn 



146 



Founded March 16, 1910 

OFFICERS 

GLENN HUNTER Senior Archon 

CLARK CULBERTSON BURRITT Junior Archon 

ARTHUR BROWN HODGES Grammateus 

BERNARD LEE HUTCHINSON Thesaurites 

ARCHONS 

Arthur Brown Hodges Phi Kappa Psi 

Grover Poster Hedges Phi Sigma Kappa 

Charles William Louchery Sigma Chi 

Glenn Hunter Phi Kappa Sigma 

Earl Wooddell Sheets Kappa Alpha 

Bernard Lee Hutchinson Delta Tau Delta 

Clark Culbertson Burritt Beta Theta Pi 

Herman Deidler Pocock Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Lonnie Watterson Ryan Sigma Nu 



148 




150 




151 



;pan Ufallenic .Association of 
Women's fraternities 

Organized April 2, 1906 

EMILY JOSEPHINE WILMOTH, President Chi Omega 

SUSAN LOUISE SMITH, Secretary Kappa Kappa Gamma 

EDITH SCOTT SMITH, Treasurer Alpha Xi Delta 

OFFICIAL DELEGATES 

Alpha Xi Delta 

Mabel Weaver Lucas Edith Scott Smith 

Leda Cordelia Atkeson 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Susan Louise Smith Margaret Buchanan 

Genevieve Stealey 

Chi Omega 

Clara Elizabeth Dickason Nellie Bassel Grumbein 

Esther Jean Gilmore 



L52 



^2Vlfl)a XiT>elta 

Founded at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, April 17, 1893 

COLORS 

Light Blue, Dark Blue and Old Gold 

FLOWER 

Pink Rose 



1 53 



Dota Chapter 

Established May 8, 1905 

Patronesses 

Mrs. Charles Edgar Hogg 
Mrs. Robert Bruce Brinsmade 
Mrs. Thomas Clark Atkeson 
Mrs. William J. Leonard 



Sorores in Urbe 



Mrs. Helen Smith 

Mrs. Mabel Weaver Lucas 



Mary Francis Chadwick 
Ethel Green 



Mary Meek Atkeson 



Lillian Ballard Smith, '09 
Marie Berghuis Krak 



Sorores in Facultate 

Sorores in Universitate 
Special 

.Mary Stewart Fravel, '10 
1911 



Leda Cornelia Atkeson 
Edith Scott Smith 

Nellie May Herring 
Eleanor Emma Herring 

Iris llrown 

Nellie May Ross 



1912 



1913 



1914 



Eva Mertelle Fling 

Leola May Smith 
Blanche Francis Emery 

Nelle Margaret McConnell 
Olive Foster Hoover 



154 



3\oll of diopters 



Established May 8, 1905 



Lombard College 
Iowa Wesleyan University 
Mt. Union College 
Bethany College 
University of South Dakota 
Wittenberg College 
Syracuse University 
University of Wisconsin 
University of West Virginia 



University of Illinois 
Tufts College 
University of Minnesota 
University of Washington 
Kentucky State University 
University of California 
Alliance Alumnae 
Mt. Pleasant Alumnae 
Boston Alumnae 



156 



(Tl)i Omega 



Founded at University of Arkansas, April 5, 1895 

COLORS 

Cardinal and Straw 

FLOWER 

White Carnation 



157 



Ol)eta Chapter 



Established June 2, 1905 



Sorores in Urbe 



Mrs. John Harrington ("ox 
Mrs. Fred Wilson Truscott 
Mrs. Charles Russell Huston 



Mrs. Waitman T. Barbe 
Mrs. James Morton Callahan 
Mrs. Gordon Handy McCoy 



Sorores in Universitate 
1911 



Helen Margaret DeBerry 
Emily Josephine YVilmoth 



Esther Gilniore 
June Cary Houston 
Edith Elwood Coombs 



Edith Gretchen Warrick 



Nelle Hassell Crumbein 



Clara Elizabeth Dickason 
Lucy Clare Clifford 



1912 



Mary Manning Holroyd 
Reha Watson Warden 
Helen Riggan Knowlton 



1913 



Helen Eilzabeth Purinton 



Special 



158 



3\otl of .Active Chapters 



University of Arkansas 
Transylvania University 
Union University 
University of Mississippi 
Randolph-Macon Woman's College 
Tulane University 
University of Tennessee 
University of Illinois 
Northwestern Univeristy 
University of Wisconsin 
Univeristy of California 
University of Kansas 



University of Nebraska 
Univeristy of Texas 
West Virginia University 
University of Michigan 
University of Colorado 
Columbia University 
Dickinson College 
Florida Woman's College 
Colby College 
University of Washington 
Univeristy of Oregon 
George Washington University 



.Alumni (Tbapters 



Fayetteville 
Washington City 
Atlanta 
Lexington 
Oxford 
Knoxville 
Chicago 
Kansas City 



New York City 

Texarkana 

New Orleans • 

Lynchburg 

Denver 

Milwaukee 

Des Moines 



160 



Iftappa TKappa 6amma 

Founded 1870 

COLORS 

Light Blue and Dark Blue 

FLOWER 
Fleur-de-lis 



161 



3£eta l£psilon (Tljapter 

Established December 22, 1906 

Sorores in Urbe 

Mrs. Ethel Finnicum Moreland (XI) Mrs. Agnes Cady Chitwood 

Mrs. Leanna Donley Brown Mrs. Nellie Dauphine Stathers 

(Gamma Rho) Mrs. Anna Jones Fowler 

Mrs. Adelaide Dovey Church (Psi) Mae B. Sullivan 
Mrs. Ida Sutherland Babb 



Margaret Buchanan 



Grace Gardner Neil 

Pearl Louise Reiner 

Susan Louise Smith 
Vaun McMinn 

Louise Stealey 

Elizabeth Josephine Cooke 
Ida Wells Smith 

I'css l!< I!" 



Sorores in Facilitate 

Flora Ray Hayes 

Sorores in Universitate 
Graduate Students 

Nell Steele 
1911 



1912 



1913 



1914 



Genevieve Stealey 

Lyda Jane Six 
Pauline Theakston 

Herma Shriver 

.Mary Louise McKinney 
Jaunita May Bartlett 



1(12 




/ 



5\oll of .Active drafters 



Boston University 
Barnard College 
Adelphi College 
Cornell College 
Syracuse University 
University of Illinois 
Swarthmore College 
Allegheny College 
Buchtel College 
Wooster University 
Ohio State University 
University of Michigan 
Adrian College 
Hillsdale College 
Tulane University 
University of California 
University of Washington 
West Virginia University 



Indiana State University 
De Pauw University 
Butler College 
University of Wisconsin 
University of Pennsylvania 
Northwestern University 
Illinois Wesleyan 
University of Minnesota 
Iowa State University 
Missouri State University 
Nebraska State University 
Kansas State University 
Colorado State University 
Texas State University 
Leland Stanford University 
University of Montana 
Kentucky University 



1C4 




165 



4?!)i ^fteta TKappa 

Established December 5, 1910 

OFFICERS 

PROFESSOR OLIVER PERRY CHITWOOD President 

PROFESSOR WILLIAM ELMORE DICKINSON Vice President 

PROFESSOR DAVID DALE JOHNSON Secretary and Treasurer 

CHARTER MEMBERS 

Professor James Morton Callahan, of Johns Hopkins Chapter 
Professor John Harrington Cox, of Brown University Chapter 
Professor Oliver Perry Chitwood, of William and Mary Chapter 
Professor William Elmer Dickinson, of William and Mary Chapter 
Arthur Rollins Graves, of Wesleyan University Chapter 
Professor David Dale Johnson, of Marietta Chapter 
Professor Charles Henry Patterson, of Tufts Chapter 

MEMBERS FROM THE FACULTY 

Professor Robert Allen Armstrong Professor John Lewis Sheldon 

Professor Waitman Barbe Professor Albert Moore Reese 

Professor Jasper Newton Deahl Professor Frank Butler Trotter 

Professor Henry Sherwood Green Professor James Russell Trotter 

Professor Clement Ross Jones Professor Frederick Wilson Truscotl 

President Daniel Boardman Purinton Professor Alexander Reid Whitehill 

MEMBERS FROM THE ALUMNI 

Frank Cox, (Mass of 1888 
Alston Gordon Dayton, Class of 1878 
Thomas Edward Hodges, Class of 1881 
George Summers Laidley, Class of lSTi! 
Hermann G. Stoetzer, Class of 1889 
Nacy McGee Waters, Class of 1886 
Israel Charles White, Class of 1872 

NOT)'] — The first election of student members, from the graduating class 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, will be held during Commence- 
ment Week. 1911. 



166 







167 




MWA-A' 




1«8 



Ol)£ Mlountain 



Founded June 3, 1904 



THE MOUNTAINEERS 



Glenn Hunter 
Clay Dille Amos 
Herman Deidler Pocock 
Lonnie Watterson Ryan 
George Walter Grow 
Arthur Brown Hodges 
Bernard Lee Hutchinson 



Wilbur Earl Gather 
James Harrison Riddle 
Charles William Louchery 
Charles George Baker 
Guy Herman Burnside 
Roy Olney Hall 
Dave Harman Kahn 
Joseph Vincent Gibson 



THE MARSH 



Jackson VanBuren Blair, 
John Benjamin Wyatt 
John Dunham Garrison 
Earl Woodell Sheets 
Miflin Marsh Wat kins 



Jr. 



Clark Culbertson Burritt 
Roscoe Harriott Posten 
Edward Henry Beardsley 
Robert Sidney Reed 



THE MODERATES 



Daniel Boardman Purinton 
Thomas Edward Hodges 
Simeon Conant Smith 
James Morion Callahan 
Charles August Lueder 
c. Edmund Neil 
Robert Allen Armstrong 
Thomas Bond Eoulk 



Frederick Lincoln Emory 
diaries Edgar Hogg 
Russell Love Morris 
John Behny Grumbein 
Arleigh Lee Darby 
Charles William Waggoner 
William Patrick Willey 



170 



Ol)£ Sphinx 



Honorary Members 

Charles Edgar Hogg 
Clement Ross Jones 
Frank Roy Yoke 



1911 



Clay Dille Amos 
Ralph Thomas Thayer 
Charles G. Baker 
Edward Henry Beardsley 
Sidney Reed 
John Benjamin Wyatt 
Earl Woodell Sheets 



Richard Jay Gould 
Arthur Brown Hodges 
Glenn Hunter 
Clark Culbertson Burritt 
Herman Deidler Pocock 
Bernard Lee Hutchinson 
L. L. MeClure 



172 



West Virginia Kntversit? Mlasonic (Tlub 

OFFICERS 

FREDERICK LAWRENCE KORTRIGHT President 

EDWARD HENRY BEARDSLEY Vice President 

.IOH N BENJAMIN WY ATT Treasurer 

ERNEST WALKER MACKLIN Secretary 



MEMBERS 



Charles (May Caste- 
Thomas Howard father 
Anthony Wencel Chez 
James Garfield Coles 
Delford Lee Cot trill 
James Damron 
Jasper Newton Deahl 
Harry Dorsey 
Levi Arthur Edwards 
Sidney Loth Friedman 
John Dunham Garrison 
Joseph Gibson 



Dr. Justin Frank Grant 
John Behny Grumbein 
Charles Edgar Hogg 
Clement Ross Jones 
Albert John Kern 
Elsey Lively 
Russell Love Morris 
James Scott Murphy 
Dr. William M. Sivey 
Francis Willard Steele 
Dennis Martin Willis 



174 




175 



3\etejos 3tcl)ancas 

Established November 23, 1908 

COLORS 
Lalo, Bardroy, Butacoli 

EMBLEM 
Cacabi 

CHUAJANI 

I1I9IM9!!! 

— lb iP . •P>n""'J , 'P . •pip -- 



X X X X X X X 
? f t ? 1 

CALLI 
Seniors 



Genevieve Stealey 
Helen Wiestling 
Helen DeBerry 

Lyda Six 
Esther Gilmore 

Louise Stealey 
Eleanor Herring 
Alice EngLe 



Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Special 



Stella Wilson 
EmilyWilmoth 



Lena Charter 
Pearl Compton 

Nellie Herring 



170 



Seo Beowulf- (&e6r?l)t 

Organized Februray 29, 1908 

MOTTO 

Gaeth A Wyrd Swa Hie Seel 

PURPOSE 

(a) Knowledge of the Epics and Minor Tales of all lands 

(b) Practice and Skill in Oral Story Telling 
(c) Social Intercourse 

MEETING PLACE 
Hrothgares Heal-Reced 

COLORS 
Fealwe — Orange and Lemon 

FLOWER 
The Daisy 

OFFICERS 

Se Forand-Sittend EMILY WILMOTil 

Se For-Sittend THOMAS McMINN 

Se Boc-Weard HELEN WIESTL.ING 

Se Elord-Weard MARLIN REINHEIMER 

Se Micel Scop MARY ATKESON 

Se Lytel Scop PEARL COMPTOK 

Seo ('wen Waes-Hael-Folces MRS. JOHN HARRINGTON COX 

Membership in the City 

Robert Allen Armtstrong Vaun McMinn 

Mary Meek Atkeson Thomas Roach McMinn 

Elma Pearl Compton Malvin 11. Reinheimer 

John Harrington <'ox Lida Jane Six 

Mrs. John Harrington Cox Edith Smith 

Anna Grace Cox Leola Smith 

Marie Rerghnis-Krak Marion Tapp 

Mary Manning llolroyd Gladys Mary Waters 

Ollie Foster Hoover Helen Merwin W'iestling 

Frank I'.. Lewellyn Emily Josephine Wilmoth 



178 




179 



Columbian Citerar? Society 



OFFICERS 



Fall Term, 1910 



Winter Term, 1911 



GEORGE H. GUNNOE President 

J. A. MAC RAE Vice President 

LIDA SIX Recording Secretary 

J. DONALD RYAN Corresponding Secretary 

A. B. LAMBDIN Treasurer 

URIAH BARNES Critic 

S. I., FRIEDMAN Chorister 

i . S. BRITTON Marshal 



A. B. LAMBDIN President 

<'. G. MARTIN Vice President 

GLADYS WATERS Recording Secretary 

NELLIE ROSS Corresponding Secretary 

ELEANOR HERRING Treasurer 

LIDA SIX Critic 

S. L. FRIEDMAN Chorister 

GEORGE H. GUNNOE Marshal 



Spring Term, 1911 

CHARLES G. BAKER President 

E. L. TYLER Vice President 

G ML DAVIS ..Recording Secretary 

URIAH BARNES Corresponding Secretary 

CHARLES RITCHIE Treasurer 

G. H. COLEBANK Critic 

CHARLOTTE BLAIR Chorister 



A. B. LAMBDIN Marshal 



Ladies 

Miss Aethursl 

.Miss Sebie Bailey 

Miss Catherine Beaumonl 

Miss Charlotte Blair 

- Gail Davis 

Miss Eleanor Herring 

Miss Nellie Herring 

Miss Margarel Hopwood 

Miss Pearl Hodges 

Miss Christine llurxthal 

Miss Maude Irwin 

Miss l-.'sta Kemper 

Miss Nellie Ross 

Miss Purley Morgan 







MEMBERS 




Miss 


Minerva Shelby 


L. 


S. 


Ilritton 


Miss 


Lida Six 


M. 


P. 


Boyles 


Miss 


Harriet Steele 


0. 


E.Duling 


Miss 


Gladys Waters 


II. 


B. 


Deem 


Miss 


Ruby Waters 


M. 


D, 


Brooks 


Miss 


.lane Hopwood 


G. 


H. 


( 'olehank 


Miss 


Mary Hopwood 


S. 


L. 


Friedman 


Miss 


Grace Cox 


G. 


F. 


l [edges 


Miss 


Nellie Cox 


G. 


II. 


Guntioe 


Miss 


Lena Carter 


11. 


M 


. Kilsore 


Miss 


Ola Smith 


A. 


B. 


Lambdin 






J. 


A. 


MacRae 




Gentlemen 


C. 


G. 


Martin 






J. 


I). 


Martin 


Uriah Barnes 


.1. 


1). 


Ryan 


C. G. 


Baker 


Edgar Speer 



\V 


. R 


. Thacher 


E. 


L. 


Tyler 


L. 


.1. 1 


jawrpuce 


R. 


II. 


Fine 


Ch 


arl 


es Ritchie 


W 


V 


. McNamar 


D. 


s. 


Mclntyre 


Bi- 


own McDonald 


ll. 


\Y 


'orking 


J. 


.1 


Jenkins 


G. 


II. 


Lemley 


G. 


H. 


Burnside 


E. 


D. 


Conaway 


L. 


P. 


Everhart 


John 


L. Robinson 


E. 


W 


, Sheets 



18(1 




181 



Ot)e Jp ar ^)^ n0tt Citerary Society 



OFFICERS 



Fall Term, 1910 



JOSEPH COCHRAN VANCE President 

SAMUEL H. DADISMAN Vice President 

VIOLA WOLFE Secretary 

WILLIAM C. LOUGH Attorney 

EVA MYRTLE FLING Chorister 

CHARLES ROY FOLTZ Marshal 



Winter Term, 1911 



CHARLES MELVIN LOUGH President 

PHILIP W. CONLEY Vice President 

BESSIE B. BELL Secretary 

SAMUEL E. SANGER Attorney 

ADELE A. NICHOLLS Chorister 

VIOLA WOLFE Critic 

JOSEPH COCHRAN VANCE Marshal 



Spring Term 1911 



SAM UEL H. SANGER 

I. O. ASH 

HARRIET HOGG 

D. L. COTTRILL 

ADELE NICHOLLS 

W. C. FLETCHER 

CHARLES MELVIN LOUGH. 



President 

.Vice President 

Secretary 

Attorney 

Chorister 

Critic 

Marshal 



MEMBERS 



Ladies 

Irene Andris 
Catherine Beaumont 
Eva Fling 
Sadie Gooseman 
Bessie Heiskel 
Harriet Hogg 
Belle Hall 
Mary Mestrezat 
Bessie Reid 
Pearl Scott 
Lorena Scott 
Pauline Theakston 
Helen Wiestling 
Helen Wilson 



Gretchen Warrick 
Lucie Sheets 

Gentlemen 
J. C. Allen 
I. O. Ash 
R. L. Bates 
J. P. Oordero 
D. L. Cottrill 
W. E. Cathers 
J. W. Correy 
J. E. Campbell 
D. R. Dodd 
S. H. Dadisman 
Henry Dorsey 
W. C. Fletcher 



H. F. Fleshman 
C. R. Foltz 
R. R. Fellar 
M. D. Fisher 
Lee Fitzgerald 
Leonard Finch 
E. T. Goff 
H. D. Groves 
Glenn Hunter 
W. S. Hopkins 
Julius Hefke 
H. C. Humphries 
A. J. Kern 
George Kerns 
Samuel K. Kelly 
A. L. Kellar 



J. B. Levy 
Charles Louchery 
Elsey Lively 
W. C. Lough 
Alex Miller 
J. H. McGarry 
M. F. Morgan 
C. C. Spiker 
F. V. Sander 
H. G. Wheat 
M. L. Bonar 
O. H. Stanard 
C. A. Wellman 



182 




183 



Woman's Ceague 



MEMBERS 

EMMA PEARL COMPTON President 

LEOLA MAY SMITH Vice President 

LYDA JANE SIX Recording Secretary 

HELEN MERWIN WIESTLING Corresponding Secretary 

GLADYS MARY WATERS Treasurer 

WOMAN'S LEAGUE BOARD 

Anna G. Sturgis Leola May Smith 

Clara Elizabeth Dickason Gladys Mary Waters 

Lyda Jane Six Emma Pearl Compton 
Helen Merwin Wiestling 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Purinton Mrs. Brinsmade 

Mrs. Chez Mrs. Leonard 

Miss Moore 

ALUMNAE 

Miss Buchanan Miss Moreland 



184 



West Virginia Kniversit? $?, *Xl. <Z. ZK. 

Organized October 1, 1871, By Robert Wiedensall of New York City 

CABINET 1911-12 

P. B. LEWELLYN President 

J. A. MAC RAE Vice President 

JOHN L. DUNKLE Secretary 

S. P. HOSKINS Treasurer 

E. J. SIMONDS General Secretary 

CHAIRMEN 

J. A. MAC RAE Devotional 

GEORGE W. GROW Bible Study 

BROWN McDONALD Membership 

J. J. JENKINS Missions 

GEORGE VIEWIG • • New Students 

A. B. LAMBDIN Music 

H. C. HUMPHREYS Finance 

BLAKE TAYLOR Social 

ALEX MILLER Employment 

E. E. EVANS Rooms 

H. B. MARR Publicity 

M. DeW. FISHER Extension 

CHARLES G. BAKER Intercollegiate 

ADVISORY BOARD 

R. A. ARMSTRONG Chairman 

O. P. CHITWOOD • • Treasurer 

E. L. SIMONDS Secretary 

A. W. Nolan T. S. Boyd 

Student Members 

A. L. Darby E. W. Sheets 

E. A. Yost G. W. Grow 

T. D. Stewart 



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187 



y. w. <z. zh. 



OFFICERS 

1910-11 

HELEN DeBERRY President 

EVA FLING Vice President 

JUNE HOUSTON Treasurer 

BESSIE REED Recording Secretary 

GLADYS WATERS Recording Secretary 

1911-12 

LTDA SIX President 

NELL McCONNELL Vice President 

PEARL CO.MPTON Treasurer 

ELEANOR HERRING • • Recording Secretary 

GAIL DAVIS Corresponding Secretary 



iss 



Ol)£ TKe^ser (Tlub 



An organization of students formerly of Keyser Preparatory School 



MEMBERS 



Charles Ritchie 
Mrs. Charles Ritchie 
Pear] Compton 
Virginia Tibhette 
Grace Darling 
Emory Tyler 



John Stealey 
Allen Lambdin 
John Dunkle 
Richard Thrush 
Bruce Baseley 
Vernon McNamar 



190 



V. V. Club 

Established Srping 1908 

OFFICERS 

'BROWNIE" HODGES Van 

'AMMY" WILMOTH Vice Van 

'HEN'* HUNTER Vaticum 

Venerable Pedestrians 

"Brownie Hodges "Bobbie" Reiner 

"Angie" Lonchery "Ammy" Wilmoth 

"Cy" Van Bibber "Merry" McKinney 
"Hen" Hunter 

Villein Creepers 

"Nelope" Steele "Stillwater" Pool 

"Neat" Bartlett "Weenie" Wiestling 



191 




Z3l>e Cn^Us!) Club 



ELECTED HONORARY MEMBERS 



Charles Henry Patterson, A. M. 
Jerome Hall Raymond, Ph. D. 
Josephine Raymond, A. M. 
Powell Benton Reynolds, D. D. 
Waitman Barbe, A. M., Litt. D. 
William Jackson Leonard 
Daniel Boardman Purinton, Ph. D., LL. D. 
James Russell Trotter, LL. B. Ph. D. 



John Harrington Cox, A.M. 

Pauline Wigin Leonard, A. M. 

Frederick Wilson Truscott, Ph. D. 

Robert Allen Armstrong, A. M., L. H. D. 

James Morton Callahan, Ph. D. 

C. Edmund Neil, A. M. 

Henry Sherwood Green, A. M., LL. D. 



ALUMNI IN FACULTY 



Simeon Conant Smith, A. M. 
Lloyd Lowndes Friend, A. B. 
Susan Maxwell Moore, A. B. 



Davil Dale Johnson, A. M. 
Maragret Buchanan, A. B. 
Mary Meek Atkeson, A. B. 



ALUMNI IN CITY 



Bertha Browning Purinton, A. M. 
Georgia Craig Truscott, A. B. 
Fred Colborn Flenniken, LL. B. 
John Arndt Yount, A. M. 



Rebecca Luella Pollock, A. B. 
Lillian Ballard Smith, A. B. 
Maud Fulcher Callahan, A. M. 
Ethel Averil Green, A. M. 



ALUMNI IN UNIVERSITY 



Cyrus Biggs Van Bibber, A. B. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Glenn Hunter, Head 
Leda Cordelia Atekson, Clerk 
Anna Grace Cox, Watch 
Gladys .Mary Waters 
Elma Pearl Comtopn 



Helen Merwin W'iestling 
Pearl Louise Reiner 
Arthur Brown Hodges 
Marion Ethel Tapp 
Frank Bowman Lewellyn 



L92 



Ol)e TJoljn W. JDavis iDemocraUc Club 

The John W. Davis Democratic Club was organized as a permanent 
club in West Virginia University during the Fall Term of 1910. It has 
an active and progressive membership of men who are interested in the 
study of government and of practical politics. 

OFFICERS 

CHARLES MELVIN LOUGH President 

DENNIS S. McINTYRE Vice President 

GEORGE R. JACKSON Secretary 

ROBERT L. BATES • Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



H. F. Fleshman 
John Dunkle 
O. E. Duling 
L. P. Caulfield 

C. C. Spiker 
G. T. Hedges 
G. H. Gunnoe 

D. S. Mclntyre 
L. R. Fitzgerald 
Earl Sheets 
William C. Lough 
S. H. Sanger 

E. L. Lively 
J. C. Vance 
J. D. May 
Charles M. Lough 
Robert L. Bates 
K. L. Henderson 
George B. Vieweg 
Neil M. Heflin 
George R. Jackson 
Julius Hefke 
Richard R. Fellar 
Clyde A. Wellman 
Robert A. Brinsmade 



Morgantown, W. Va. 
Deer Run, W. Va. 
Morgantown, W. Va. 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Masontown, W. Va. 
Spencer, W. Va. 

Hepzibah, W. Va. 
Cameron, W. Va. 
Lost Creek, W. Va. 
Cameron, W. Va. 
Sanger, W. Va. 
Roseville, W. Va. 
Morgantown, W. Va. 
Dovesville, W. Va. 
Cameron, W. Va. 
Kearneysville, W. Va. 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Grafton, W. Va. 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Dayton, O. 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 
Huntington, W. Va. 
Morgantown, W. Va. 



193 



5ttarsl)all Collage Club 

OFFICERS 

EVA M. FLING President 

MAE SULLIVAN Secretary 

W. R. GOFF Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



J. D. Garrison 
Mrs. J. D. Garrison 
G. L. Hoover 
Olive Foster Hoover 
Mrs. Anna Fowler 
Margaret Buchanan 
Esther Gilmore 
Howard Fleshman 
Beulah Davis 
Homer Grimm 
Mr. Stanard 
Mr. Ramsey 
Fred Weltner 



George Phillips 
Lewis Caldwell 
W. W. Johnson 
Blanche Emery 
Herman Shriver 
Zora Wilcox 
Flora Ray Hayes 
Susan Smith 
Mary Berry 
Blanche Hackney 
M. F. Smith 
Sam Biern 
Oscar Biern 



Charlotte Wade 
D. L. Cottrill 
H. Dorsey 
S. H. Dadisman 
Eric Foulk 
A. S. Lively 
H. D. Groves 
Harry Humphreys 
Clyde Wellman 
John Yanigan York 
Cyrus Van Bibber 
L. A. Edwards 



104 




195 



Wzsl Virginia ICtUversit? JDramatic (Hub 

OFFICERS 

WILBUR E. GATHER . . .• President 

ALBERT J. KERNS Vice President 

MARY MANNING HOLROYD Secretary 

HARRY WILLIAM KING, JR Treasurer 

C EDMUND NEIL Director 

MEMBERS 

Irene Marie Andris Pearl Scott 

Charles Edward Hodges Boyd Milford Smith 

J. Clyde Kinsey Miflin Marsh Watkins 

Alexander Miller Nellie Weltner 

Pearl Hodges Emily Wilmoth 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Mrs. C. Edmund Neil Simen Conant Smith 



19 (J 




THE LOVE SCENE 



Mi %i 




SCHOOL DRAMATICS 



108 




I'll) 



W$t Jfflononpltan 

A LITERARY MAGAZINE 
Published by the Students of West Virginia University 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Lenard Julius Bernstein Editor-in-Chief 

Leda Cordelia Atkeson Assistant Editor-in-Chief 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Olive Foster Hoover Lucy Clare Clifford Eva Myrtelle Fling 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
John L. Robinson 88 Beverly Avenue, Morgantown 



200 



®he ^tl)eimeitm 

Published every Monday during the 
college year by a staff elected by the 
Students Publishing Association of 
West Virginia University 



ATHENAENUM BOARD 



Editor-inChief 
Charles M. Lough, '11 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief 
Emily Wilmoth, '11 

Organizations 
Leola M. Smith, '12 

Personals 
George H. Gunnoe, '11 

Exchanges 
Harry G. Wheat, '12 

Athletics 
Clay D. Amos, '11 

Alumni 
Charles E. Hodges, '13 

Business Manager 
Howard F. Fleshman, '11 



202 



W^t jWonttcola 

Class 1912 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

M. M. WATKINS. Editor-in-Chief 

MARY M. HOLROYD, Ass's Editor-in-Chief 

FRANK B. LEWELLYN, Business Manager 

Board of Editors 

Rhea W. Warden \vt 

Susan Smith Calendar 

Dnffy Floyd Athletic 

Irene Andris Society 

Clarke Pool Literary 

Clyde Pugh Fraternity 

Committees 

Organizations 
Clyde C Tush Logan McDonald 

Harry Wheat Leola Smith 

Calendar 
Susan Smith Lida Jane Six 

Society 
Irene .Marie Andris 

Art 
Rhea Watson Warden George B. Viewig 

Athletics 
Edgar Boyle Speer Homer Walkup 

Fun 

Marsh Walkins Mary Manning Holroyd 



L'n-i 



(Tl)oral Society 



Jessie Fitch 
Gertrude Hayes 
Pearl Reiner 
Nellie Weltner 
Irene Madera 
Catherine Beaumont 
Mancaleen Forman 
Agnes Cady Chitwood 
Margaret Jones 
Mattie Stewart 
Cassandra Burnett 
Mary Berry 
Gillian Garrison 
Mary Williams 
Elizabeth Jones 
lElsie Jones 
Florence Smith 
Regina Smith 
Viola Hall 
Bess Heiskell 
Lorena Scott 
Helen Knowlton 
Rhea Warden 
Mary Batten 
.leanette Clarke 



Eugene R. Evans 
Raymond Creel 
Adele Nicholls 
John Gregg 
Howard Holt 
Frank Morgan 
Grace Snee 
Charlotte Blair 
Charles Baker 
Clyde Beckett 
E. G. Nicholls 
T. M. Nicholls 
J. B. Krak 
Lawrence Cox 
Helen Treat 
Mary Hogg 
Minnie Hennen 
Anna Johnson 
Elizabeth Biersack 
Bessie Dalinsky 
Mary LaRue 
Gertrude Davies 
Edna Leyman 
Janet Thomas 
Charles G. Cox 



H .C. Humphreys 
Ethel Winette 
Belle P. Hall 
Mrs. Louise Chez 

A. B. Lambdin 
W. W. Johnson 
E. C. Brown 
Emerson Carney 
Edna Babb 
Marie Joseph 
Virginia Mulvey 
Laura Briggs 
Zelma Hayhurst 
Clyde Kinsey 

B. M. Smith 
John Wanamaker 
I. V. D. Shunk 
Mrs. Frank Trotter 
Ursula Shunk 
Cecil Sanderson 
Leona Martin 

Mrs. J. R. Moreland 
David J. Roberts 
James A. Koontz 



208 



XCniversit? Orchestra 



Directed by Miss Margaret Home 



Ladies 



Wambaugh 


Atekson 


Jacobs 


Beaumont 


Donlin 


Price 


Andris 


Gentlemen 




Holt 


Shenk 


Cox 


Smith 


H. J. Beaumont 


Hamil 


Taylor 


R. Miller 


Hefke 


Haught 


A. Miller 


Finch 


A. Beaumont 


Marvin 


Heisekll 


Tuckwiller 


Holland 


Griffen 



209 



\#. V. K. String GuarUtte 



MISS MARGARET HORNE First Violin 

MR. J. H. HOLT Second Violin 

MR. B. M. SMITH Viola 

MR. J. HERBERT BEAUMONT 'Cello 

Program of Last Concert 
Quintette Schumann 

For Pianoforte and Quartette 

Quartette Hadyn 

Peer Gynt Suite Grieg 

Pianoforte .Clarinet and Quartette 



210 




ATE A (Lock AND ALL'S WELL 



212 



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SEPTEMBER 

Sept. 18 — Large kissing and hand-shaking at the sta- 
tion. Rushing begins. 

Sept. 19 — Registration. Bobby declares that she needs 
a Coach to help her register. All the girls decide to major 
in football. 

Sept. 20 — Delta Tan Delta Smoker. Freshmen long for 
home, and write copious letters all afternoon. 

Sept. 21 — Phi Kappa Psi Smoker. 

Sept. 22 — Convocation. Dr. Reynolds last appearance, 
officially, before the public. 

Sept. 23 — Gym Stag party. Y. W. C. A. picnic supper 
in Woman's parlor. 

Sept. 24 — Sigma Chi dance. 

Sept. 25 — Merry Mac forgets the departed Senior and 
falls in love with the Prep. 

Sept. 26— Time, Monday night. Place, Woman's Hall. 
Cause, Callers. Result, Clash with Miss Moore. Freshmen 
elect officers. 

Sept. 27 — Sue Smith sprains her ankle. Dr. Reese to 
the rescue. Sophomore class meeting. 

Sept. 28 — Chi Omega reception. Juniors elect officers. 
Great stacks of books float about the Campus, supported by 
Freshmen. Sophs post challenge to shrinking shrimps of 
Freshmen. 

Sept. 29 — Senior Class meeting. Miss Wilson and Miss 
DcBerry both anxious to be President. Sophs deface town 



with Freshman posters. Wanted for Freshies, a Webster's 
unabridged. 

Sept. 30 — First Pan Hellenic dance. Clog music, 
crowded floor, and hot night. "Marks" of happiness on 
Clare's face. 

OCTOBER 

Oct. 1— W. V. V. 6, Westminster 0. Kappa Kappa 
Gamma dinner. Y. M. and Y. W. receptions take place at 
the Armory. How are you classed'/ "Have you been home- 
sick?" Faculty forget the date. There is another new stu- 
dent. — a Delta Tau pledge I suspect. 

Oct. 2 — Rushing continues. "The better the day the 
better the deed." 

Oct. 3 — Freshmen suddenly become enthusiastic. 

Oct. 4 — White paint evident, 

Oct. 5 — More white paint. Sophs and Freshmen begin 
their fight. Freshmen win the class rush. 

Oct. 6 — Monticola Board has its first meeting. Womans 
League Exchange is started. All doors in the hall are plas- 
tered with signs, reading: "Manicuring," "Hairdressing," 
"Shoe Polishing," "Hat Trimming," etc. Also, Matrimon- 
ial Exchange. Cases worked up while you wait! No case, 
no pay ! Come in. 

(Signed) Madame Vaitn McMinn. 



213 



Freshies become very hilarious about 1 :00 A. M. 
in No. 14, is very much disturbed. 

Oct. 7 — Dr. Stathers makes a mistake. Sophs 



Did, 



and 



Freshmen patronize Woman's Hall at 2:00 A. M.. a "Moore" 
chilly reception than the night before. 

Oct. 9 — Dr. Bates lectures at the Presbyterian church. 

Oct. in — Sophs and Freshmen have another battle. 
Freshies win. Hurrah! John Paul Jones in the front rank. 
encourages the freshies. Coach Hurlburt good at bridg- 
ing it. 

Oct. 11 — Seniors at Woman's Hall invite Freshmen girls 
to a spread. The spread is on the bed. Freshmen meet 
until 12:30 A. M.. to decide on ways and means. 

Oet. 12 — M. M. cuts Anglo Saxon. How dare she he so 
bold! 

Oct. 13 — Sammy Brown gets cross. (.Joke?) 

Oct. 14 — Kappa house party at Cheat Club House. 

Oct. l."> — W. V. V. 0, Bethany (>. Merry sprains her 
ankle. 

Oct. 17 — .Miss Moore and Profs, hold a conference. Prof. 
G. still wearing his straw hal and hasn't been mobbed yet. 
Jack Blair absent from committee meeting. .Mar — vo — Ions!! 

Oct. is— All of Womans Hall "plum" sick. Ask no 
more. 

Oct. 1!) — O. Stealey sprains her ankle too. Neal W.. 
steals hack to Woman's Hall once more. IV. Hodges over- 
hears a conversation. T. X. E. meets. 

Oct. 20 Junior meet. Big mass meeting. "Showers" 
of all kinds continue. 

Oct. 21- Clare C. and Lyda S. are Loyal t<» the "Ex- 
change. " 

Oct. 22— W. V. l\ ()'.. I'.ucknell !>. Sigma Chi Dance. 

Oct. 23 Everybody hears Dr. Barrett. 

Oct. 24 — Dr. Deahl keeps a class overtime. 

Oct. 25 Marshall McDonald holds a reception on the 
campus. Miss M. entertains the Upper Ten. 

Oct. 26 Firsi n ting of the Dramatic Cluh. 

Oct. 27 Woman's Hall very much rushed. Callers are 
conspicuous. 



Oct. 28 — Pan Hellenic Dance. Alice E. wants to he in 
style so she sprains her ankle. 

Oct. 2!) — Woman's League ^ives a Hallo'e'en party. 

Oct. 8<> — The preps go walking. 

Oct. 31— Hobble skirts at the ultima!! 

NOVEMBER 

Nov. 1 — The English Cluh meets. 

Nov. 2 — Angie goes to the station to get a last farewell. 
Awful sloppy. That is — the weather. 

Nov. 4 — Armory Dance. Cadets and rats blossom out. 

Nov. .1— Pitt. !!. W. V. P. !!?$. 

Nov. 7 — B. Dodges blushes. Curses!! Such unsophis- 
tication. Sigma Phi Epsilon initiation. 

Nov. S — Duffy Floyd was seen smiling. (Keep it dark.) 

Nov. 1" — President and Mrs. Purinton present their 
daughter to Society. 

Nov. 11 — Pan Hellenic Dance. Girls draw cuts to see 
who will wear Ida's puffs. Phi Psi initiation. Nita, who is 
always in the swim, sprains her ankle. 

Nov. 12— Sigma Xu initiation. Bethany 0, W. V. V. 8. 
Captain Rudolph Munk killed in the game. 

Nov. 13 — Gov. Glenn lectures. 

Nov. 14 — Sewing Clubs becomes very fashionable. 

Nov. 1") — Everybody late to classes. 

Nov. 16 — No school on account of Captain Munk's 
funeral. 

Now 17 — Grace finally goes. Sigma Chi initiation. 
White and Burgess make their appearance as singers. 

Nov. 18 — Kappa Kappa Gamma initiation. Cadet Hop. 

Nov. P> — Phi Psi and Delta Tau makes a raid on Fair- 
mont. Marshall College Club meets. 

Nov. 21 — Hurlburt walks from Fairmont, via "le rail- 
road. " 

Nov. 22 — Simeon becomes an artist. 

Nov. 23 — Frat. Dance. Quantity leave for Thanksgiv- 



214 



iug vacation. Quality remain. Farewell party for Coach 
Hurlburt. "Prexy" arrives as true as "Steele." 

Nov. 24 — .Miss Hedrick and her pal dissipate. They go 
to the moving pictures, and other things. 

Nov. 2.i — The Dean goes to Uniontown to spend the day. 
Hurray ! 

Nov. 26 — Mary II. says that she wouldn't think of going 
to the dance. Why.' Because Buck's great aunt by mar 
riage is dead. 

Nov. 28 — T. N. E. initiation, college "spirits" very much 
in evidence. 

Nov. 29 — Helen D. is the cause of much worry for the 
Dean and her room-mate. Let us hope that Miss M. doesn't 
wear the baby blanket that McCreery's so kindly sent her. 

Nov. 30— Helen Vance, TO, visits the Hall. 

DECEMBER 

Dec. 1— Dr. Whitehill gets fussed. Military Hop. 

Dec. 2— T. X. E. Dance. 

Dec. 3— Y. W. C. A. Christmas Sale. 

Dee. 4 — Woman's Hall parlor crowded at 8:45. Did 
they all go to church I ? 

Dec. 5 — Phi Beta Kappa installation. Reception at 
President's House. Ed. Speer and Dave Reger with a load 
of Delt Preps, try to slip one over on South Park Hill. Re- 
sult, no more coasting for them this season. 

Dec. 6 — Last Chapel exercises conducted by Dr. Rey- 
nolds. First Choral Concert. Editor of Montieola reads 
"Hell Number of Life" for inspiration. 

Dec. 7 — Simeon brings the Dean home. Lights are low. 

Dec. 8— Miss Caldwell describes Mr. Smith. Delt 
sleigh ride. Phi Kappa Sigma initiation. 

Dec. 9 — Everybody goes to see the Merry Widow. 
Dec. 10 — Louise S. actually says that she isn't sleepy. 

Dec. 11— "Middy," the Phi Psi Collie, calls at Wo- 
man 's Hall and takes the girls out walking. 



Dec. 12 — Orchestra Concert. 

Dec. 13— See Sept. 31. 

Dec. 14 — Exams begin. Don't worry? 

Dec. 15 — Mary X. buys a Geology. She is afraid of 
flunking. 

Dec. 16 — Fall term ends. 

Dee. 17 — Special Extra ! ! Dr. Chitwood and Agnes 
Cady tie up. Dr. Reese sings. 

JANUARY 

Jan. 3— Station platform crowded. Pearl Compton : 
"Gorsh! How 1 Hate to kiss GIRLS. 

•Ian. 4 — Horrors! Horrors! and then some. Geology, 
tin 1 cinch course, has become a course of study. Ten flunked. 

Jan. 5 — Convocation address. Woman's Hall rushed. 

Jan. 6 — Professor Cox and Midget go walking. Ida 
burns the feather off that precieux hat. 

Jan. 7 — Mrs. Neil entertains the Kappas in honor of 
Maud Brown. 

Jan. 8 — Horrible wind in the night. 

Jan. 9 — Miss Moore decides that she wouldn't live 
long, if she lived in Iowa. That is much longer. 

Jan. 10 — Prex. still strong for Steele, Kemper L. re- 
turns to school and prepares to start to classes. 

Jan. 11 — Homer swears that he will never use another 
English 10 theme in English 11. Simeon advises his classes 
to attend the theatre often. All of English 11 at the moving 
pictures that night. Prexy entertains the agricultural Col- 
lege. 

Jan. 12 — G. Stealey cuts class, the ninth time in twenty 
years. Alpha Xi Deltas on their good behavior. Miss Bald- 
win, their Grand Secretary makes a visit. 

Jan. 13 — Miss Baldwin addresses the Pan Hellenic As 
sociation. 

Jan. 14 — Alpha Xi Delta reception. Clare exercises a 
Senior privilege. "Mark" well! 11 :00 P. M. and the lights 
in Woman's Hall not out. 



215 



Jan. 16— Delta Tau Delta theatre parly to the '-.Man 
of the Hour." 

Jan. IS — Betas on their good behavior. Their Grand 
Secretary comes to town. Postie dusts his Bible. 

Jan. 19— Kappas entertain with a dinner party at the 
Hotel -Madera. 

dan, 20— Delta Tan Delta initiation. Military Hop. 
Everybody goes. 

Jan. 22— Dr. Sweets' lecture. 

Jan. 2-'> — The sun shines and the V. V. club becomes 
enthusiastic The Stringed Quartet gives a concert. Nita 
B. appears in a Sigma Chi pin. Whose can it be? 

Jan. 25 — All go to see Grace George. Prof. Barnes 
makes a mistake and gets locked out of his class room. Esther 
says that it is the middle of the month, but Louise argues 
that it is only the fifteenth. 

•Ian. 2(> — .Miss M. loses her switch. 

Jan. 27 — Pan Hellenic Dance 

Jan. 28 — Pin Kappa Sigma skating party at Phillips. 

Jan. 20 — 0. G. ('lull organized. Nell Cox receives a 
Charter to he very Frank these days. 

Jan. 31- Large crowd at Chapel?? Have you noticed 
how "Grac(e)ious Jumbo Haworth is? 

FEBRUARY 

Feb. 1— 

Time— 10:00 P. M. 

Place — 1'nion Station, Morgantown. 

Girl — Maud Brown. 

K'e»uie in background : "Did she come".' 

Feb. 2 English Club meets. Chi Omega entertains. 

The day after Miss Moore's talk on promptness to meals and 
cleanliness. Emily risine; al 7 :2."> A. M.. can't decide wheth- 
er to take lime to wash her face and be late to breakfast, or 
be on time and let her face wail. She decides that Hie latter 
is best, as it will not be so easily delected. 

Feb. '■> The Dramatic Club presents "My Qncle from 
India." Gin- editor cracks his head. 



Feb. 4 — Y. W. C. A. and Woman's League entertain at 
the President's House. 

Feb. 6 — The Calendar editor goes to Comuntzis, in 
search of news, gossip, men, or anything, but — nothing doing. 

Feb. 7 — The new Economics Professor quizzes his 
classes! Fierce! 

Feb. 8 — Look who's here. Who said the Preps could 
go to moving pictures. 

Feb. !)— Nell S. and Dick G. celebrate their birthdays. 

Feb. 10— Taken from the Bulletin board: 

Notice — A mass meeting is called to decide on winch 
of Brownie Hodges numerous proofs is the best. 7. ••';<> 
P. M. at Commencement Hall. 

Feb. 11 — Beowulf Gedryht meets. 

Feb. 12— Tommy McMinn visits Woman's Hall. How 
strange. 

Feb. 13 — The Junior Laws gently I ?) remind Prexy 
that this is a legal holiday. 

Feb. 14 — W. Y. U. on its good behavior, — making a hit 
with the Carnegie Foundation man. Valentine celebrations 
at Woman's Hall. Candy and Flowers very much in evi- 
dence .' 

Feb. 15 — Monticola voting contest begins with much en- 
thusiasm. Grand initiation. 

Feb. Hi — All Woman's Hall in great confusion. Every- 
body wants No. I) in the voting contest. 

Feb. 17 — Chi Omega entertains. "Sunshine" C. hasn't 
time to be on the Calender Committee. — he is too busy at 
tending Balls. 

Feb. 18 — Mistress .Martha Washington, and Mistress 
Mary Ann Jefferson entertain in honor of Miss Nellie Curtis, 
and Miss Deborah Adams. Sigma Nu initiation. 

Feb. 19 — Helen W. says she didn't gel enough gravy 
for dinner. She is told that she can have all the gravy she 
wants this afternoon. 

Feb. 20 — All of Woman's Hall compelled to remain in- 
side to-day. The Hall Cat gol out last aighl and destroyed 
all the loose coill'iires. 



21 fi 



Feb. 21— Elk's Minstrels. 

Feb. 22 — Sigma Chi House Party begins. 

Feb. 23 — Madame Sehuman Heink Concert under the 
auspices of the Choral Society, Phi Psi banquet. Sigma Chi 
Dance. 

Feb. 14— The best Military Ball ever! Phi Kappa Psi, 
and Phi Sigma Kappa reception. 

Feb. 25 — Matinee Dance at the Armory. Phi Sigma 
Kappa party. Sigma Chi dance. Delta Tau Delta Dinner 
party. Dr. Deahl took care of the children while his wife 
heard Madame Sehuman Heink. He should be put out of 
the University, this is strictly out of his line. 

Feb. 26 — Everybody sleeps. 

Feb. 27 — Sigma Chi House Party adjourns. Jimmie 
Riddle writes an expository paper on a sermon. Query, by 
the Prof.: "AVas it an imaginary sermon, Mr. Riddle?" 

Feb. 28— Billy R. describes the Military Ball in French, 
and makes quite a hit. C. Louchery meets Dean Hogg on the 
street. The Dean cordially invites Chase to visit the Law 
School . 

MARCH 

Alar. 1 — Miss Moore goes to Pittsburg. All the girls are 
late to breakfast. 

Mar. 2— English Club. 

Alar. 3 — Poolie goes to Fairmont to see a fair lady. 

Mar. 4 — Alarshall College Club meets. Alpha Xi Delta 
entertains. 

Alar. 5 — Sunday evening. Individual parlors wanted 
at AVoman's Hall. 

Alar. 6 — Dramatic Club makes a hit in Parkersburg. 

Mar. 7 — Lem J. makes a mistake in Chemistry. 
"Borax." 



Alar. 8 — Phi Kappa Psi Theatre party at •'Bright Eyes." 

Alar. 10— Stanley S. and Tommy T. call at AVoman's 
Hall. Lon Lanham visits at the Hall. 

Alar. 11 — Billy and Bully from the "Hungry Orches- 
tra" serenade room 9 at AVoman's Hall but no reward. The 
Rarebit had gone to strings. 

Mar. 12 — Dr. Aloffit lectures at the Presbyterian church. 

Alar. 13 — Miss AI entertains the French Club. The 

? is, did they talk French? 

Alar. 14 — The Country may be saved yet. Libby and 
Adda go to Chapel. Alice E. takes the leading man away 
from the leading lady. Hard luck. Faculty Concert. Flora 
Montgomery visits at AVoman's Hall. 

Alar. 15 — Students Concert. Frat jeweler comes to 
Woman's Hall. Shirts become the latest fad. Prof. Hodges 
leaves for Europe. 

Alar. 17 — Prof. Graves actually blushes. St. Patrick's 
Dance at the Armory. 

Alar. 18 — Helen De Berry makes a flying trip to Pitts- 
burg. 

Alar. 20— When Prof. S . asked Mr. C. if lie had 

finished writing his story, he replied: "1 can hardly tell the 
truth, let alone tell a story." 

Alar. 21 — Last Day. Alake a good impression. 

Alar. 24 — Spring vacation begins. 

Alar. 28 — Spring term work starts with a vim. Many 
start out to study — Nature. 

Alar. 2!) — The Kappas initiate their new rooms. 

Alar. 30 — Convocation address. "Why are yon looking 
so forelorn?" "Oh nothing, only 1 took Economies for a 
cinch." 

Alar. 31 — The Editor in Chief commands that this non- 
sense stop. 



217 




218 




219 



J* 




• VT-esV Chestnuts. 

-_-i — -■ — — , — . — . ^.>r^> 



Dear Hogg. "Mr. Smith, a Living man can not have 
heirs, can he?" 

A.jax Smith. "No Sir, a living man can't have heirs 
until In- is dead." 

Mr. Goff. i In Botany.) This plant acquired charac- 
teristics which il transmitted to its ancestors." 

The Education Class was discussing bonds. Dr. Deahl, 

to Clare. ".Miss Clifford, have yon a Bond thai holds yon?" 

Dr. Armstrong. "Mr. Teter, what profession did 
Holmes undertake beside that of Literature?" 
Teter. "He undertook Doctor." 

Dr. A. "Well, can't yon express il Letter.'" 
Teter. ' ' Well, he took medicine. " 




FLUNKED 



220 




N.fc«» us. tW.-HidW Enow* 



Prof. Trotter. "What is a stock dividend?" 
Louchery. "Well, when a man owns a stock farm, and 

pays his debts with cattle, that is what is called a 'stock 

dividend.' " 

Sammy after looking all around for Sells, finally dis- 
covered him crouched down behind the big map. 

"Mr. Sells, I tired of looking all over the world for 
you. ' " 

Pep Speer. "Coach, if a professor balls you out is it 
right to hit him?" 

Coach Leuder. "No Sir! Never strike an inferior." 

Prof. Emory. "When does a tree stop growing?" 
C. Martin. "When somebody cuts it down.'' 

S. Brown. "Mr. Cox, that wasn't right." 
Stanley. "It isn't hey, well, you just look in the book 
and see." 




OUR NEW PLEDGE 



221 



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morgantown, oct., 1910. 
Dear Bill : — 

It's too bad you weren't in school this term, old scout. 
On the level you missed one of the niftiest class rushes that 
was ever pulled off in this neck of the woods. You know the 
one we had last year was pretty punk, but this year, take 
it from me, it was the best. There was a whole lot of rival- 
ry in the first place, before the tiling was started. One 
night about sixteen Sophs picked on a little twelve-year-old 
Freshman, and laboring under a mistaken idea of humor, 
clipped his hair. The Preshies resented the insult to Celler, 
or Sells, whatever his name is, and came back at them, by 
cutting the hair off a Soph named Baker, and then the stuff 
was off. They monkeyed around for a couple of weeks, and 
President York, of the Sophs, slept with his dresser against 
the door, and with a gun under his pillow. Finally when 
the Sophs ignored a challenge to a free-for-all tight, the 
Greenies got so chesty that something had to be done, so 
notices of the Rush were posted. 

I think about everybody in school gathered on the 
campus that night, for the place was jammed The Freshics, 
bossed by the Juniors, formed over by Science Hall, and 
waited. Pretty soon the Sophs rambled over from Com- 
mencement Hall in a body. There was a good bit of stall- 
ing around then, for President York of the Sophs, didn't 
hanker after leading his classmates to victory. He finally 
got Coach Leuder to take him out on the plea that he was 
a football player. He a football player, — they almost river - 
ed him for slander. Anyhow he strawberried, and the fight 
was on. 

They went at it as if they liked it. The .Juniors and 
Preps, — I mean the Freshman, — seemed to have it on the 
Sophs when they first bumped, and that, didn't suit at all, 
so thev started individual rushes. One big rawboned Freshie 



dragged Earl Mealy all over the lot before he found out 
that it wasn't part of the game. Tommy Hodges picked out 
the biggest Freshman he could find and blipped him on the 
bean. It was a beautiful tight while it lasted 1 . Tommy was 
able to walk home, — with assistance. 

The second rush started witb the Sophs somewhat 
scared, all but Marl Keenan. He was yelling: '"Let me at 
'em! Let me at 'em." Well they got started, and put 
Keenan in the front, rank of the Sophs. Blip! They hit 
just like Zach Taylor hits the line, and Keenan disappeared. 
The front rank of the Freshman seemed to go straight up 
in the air, and then came down on Keenan, and Keenan 
(put yelling: "Let he at 'em." Dick Fellar insisted on 
jumping on top of the bunch, so they took him off to one 
side, and removed his clothes, one square inch at a time. 
It was soon over. The Infants pushed the Sophs right off 
the edge of the map. The bystanders dug Keenan out from 
under the wreckage, and sent him home in the same ambu- 
lance with Tommy Bodges 

When they took stock, the Sophs found out that they 
(didn't have enough shirts to go around, so rather than 
shock the aesthetic sensibilities of the assembled populace, 
they sneaked home through the alleys. The Preshies had it 
on them in this respect, so they divided up what clothes they 
did have and marched down street singing, "'Hail! Hail!" 
When they had gone, someone discovered two Freshics under 
Martin Ball porch, just pulling each others hair to a fare- 
you-well. Kemp Littlepage. who was the referee, spanked 
them and sent them home. The other bunch, the big 
bunch, ran foul of a policeman down High street, and he 
chased them home, and the Rush was over. 

Well, I must go to breakfast pretty soon, so I will have 
to stop ; let me hear from you soon. 

Your old college chump, 

Percy Cholmondeley Jones. 



223 




■}*.. L^W M o -r c. 



Engii r. "What are you reading?" 

Law Student. "I'm reading a treatise on metal for 
steel users." 

E. "What steel do you use? Steel pens.'" 
L. S. "No, Craft.'* 

Professor Barnes. "We have a Lot of absent students 
with us today." 

Fat Wyatt. "Buck, HI tell you a joke for the min- 
strel show." 

King. "Let her come." 

Pat ".lust go up to some man in the chorus, and then 
give him something, say. well, a half dollar. 

King. "That's no job — that's a calamity." 

Professor Barnes was lecturing on ••Sympathy" before 
the Columbian Literary Society. "In lime of trial." he said, 
•■what brings the greatesl comfort .'" 

••An acquittal!" shouts the low). row Junior Law. 




224 



Th® MSI©! -1 © Own 



C^W8^K» 



■ 




■ 


"EAR EDlTORlMS -. 





What is it a joke? Here is a scientific definition as 
expounded by Professor Eisland. "A joke is a very pleas- 
ant absurdity, contrasting- with one's habitual expectation." 
It must arouse laughter, excite surprise, and give pleasure. 
It must impress the hearer with an idea of the unexpected, 
the incongruous or the absurd. If it fails in any of these 
essentials, or if it fails to contain all these elements in the 
same proportions, it is not a good joke. Now there are 
many things that arouse laughter that are not jokes. For 
instance, the other night I dropped a "Code" on my pet 
corn. Everybody in the room laughed, but it wasn't a joke; 
far be it from such. The simple reason that it did not give 
pleasure, an essential element, proves that it was not a real 
joke. Now there are a great many little "Sayings" in this 
book, that purport to be jokes. If you fail to laugh at any 
of them, stop a minute and analyze them. Then even if 
you do find that they are not really funny, you will at least 
have found them instructive, and they will be of some good 
use. Here are two to begin on : 



"What do you charge for rooms?" 
Five dollars up." 

But I am a student." 

Five dollars clown." 

* * * 

Lee H. "See here! I've been standing here in front 
of this window for twenty-five minutes." 

Ticket agent. ( Gently. ) "I 've been standing behind 

this window for twenty-five years." 

* * * 

BY THE WAY 

Be good and you will be ionesome. 

In playing poker, a good deal depends on your luck. 
Your luck usually depends on a good deal. 

Manj^ are called but few are chosen. Many are cold 
but few are frozen 

When in doubt tell the truth. 

SOME PEOPLE 
Who are crazy to be married are only temporarily insane. 
Who are only bubbles, stay up in the air too long. 
Who think they are guests are only jests. Jest so. 
When they quarrel, let one word lead to another until the}' 

acquire a vocabulary that is astonishing in more ways 

that one. 



225 



TO SUE 

She called me dear. 

We walked upon the Campus, Sue and I, 

Beneath the shining moon and starry sky. 

My soul with love o'erflowed. To her I told 

The passion in my heart, that story old. 

She pinned my diamond t'rat pin on her waist, 

Then token of our love, we two embraced'. 

We parted at her gate: with none to hear, 

She held my hand awhile, and called me "Dear." 

The above effusion was submitted by Freshman, as 
Literature. In reply would like to state. 

* * * 

TO "A FRESHMAN" 

Oh. you poor cuss, it you just knew, 
How had that skirt was stringing you. 
Why hoy, that stunt ain't nothing new — 
You get thai from the whole blame crew. 
Then it' you put your pin on Sue, 
She'll call you dear all right, that's true. 
And you'll find out before you're through, 
That she is dear dern d'ear to vou. 



RUSHING THE SEASON 

The maiden's nose is rosy red — 

"Kercboo, achoo, kershoo!'' 

Too soon her winter togs she shed. 

To don her peek-a-boo. 

* * * 

"Alfonso XIII," says the Woman's Home Companion, 
was the son of Alfonso XII, who died two months before he 
was born, at the age of twenty-eight." Poor Alt'. He died 

young. 

* * * 

Kinsey at a Banquet. "I Hatter myself that I made 
quite a hit with that song. By the way, who was the man 
who was moved to tears and went out.'" 

Toastmaster. "That was the composer." 

* * * 

They are still fighting in — 
Mexico. 

Albany, 

Preston ( ounty. 

Charleston and 

Africa. 




226 




,REX©^6iprt""*3 



227 



Foster of (Torps of (Labats 

WILLIAM S. WEEKS 2nd Lieut. 4th Infantry, Commandant 

HENRY ST. CLAIR Ordnance Sergeant, U. S. A., Armorer 

FIELD AND STAFF 

GEORGE W. GROW Cadet Major 

JOHN N. SIMPSON Captain, Surgeon 

HARRY G. WHEAT Cadet Captain, Adjutant 

CLAUDE S. TETRICK Cadet Captain, Officer of the Day 

LEONARD J. BERNSTEIN.... Cadet 1st Lieutenant, Quartermaster 

PRANK V. SANDERS Cadet 1st Lieutenant, Officer of the Guard 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF 

KARL H. GORMAN Cadet Sergeant Major 

JAY B. LEVY Cadet Quartermaster Sergeant 

JOHN Y. YORK Cadet Color Sergeant 

TRUMAN M. MARTIN Cadet Color Sergeant 

GEORGE R. JACKSON Cadet Chief Trumpeter 

BAND 

WALTER A. MESTREZAT Chief Musician 

THOMAS C. PITZER Cadet Principal Musician 

CLAUDE C. HAMILTON Cadet Drum Major 

CADET SERGEANTS 

Julius H. Hefke Arthur L. Frye 

Eugene C. Hammel Leonard L. Finch 

CADET CORPORALS 

Alphonza L. Ellis L. B. Griffin 

.John H. Beaumont H. S. Meldahl 

Constantine G. Psaki E. F. Heiskell 

N. C. Burdett R. R. Fellar 



228 



COMPANY "A" 

JOHN L. ROBINSON Cadet Captain 

MILTON DeW. FISHER Cadet 1st Lieutenant 

STEPHEN P. HOSKINS Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

JONATHAN C. POWELL 1st Sergeant 

(II ARLES S. ROBINSON Sergeant 

FORREST P. COOMBS Sergeant 

CADET CORPORALS 

J. F. Robinson Landon J. Sigler 

Jesse J. Jenkins Robert L. Bates 

CADET MUSICIAN 

J. R. Adams 

COMPANY "B" 

NEAL M. HEFLIN Cadet Captain 

ALLAN B. LAMBDIN Cadet 1st Lieutenant 

LEWIS G. BURRELL Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

IRL N. DULING Cadet 1st Sergeant 

A. R. GROVES Sergeant 

J. S. MILLER . . . Sergeant 

CADET CORPORALS 

Marshall D. Brooke Clifford H. Snider 

Philip M. Conley Russell H. Gist 



CADET MUSICIAN 
C. L. Mann 

COMPANY "C" 

CHARLES G. BAKER Cadet Captain 

EUGENE E. EVANS Cadet 1st Lieutenant 

J. C. ALLEN Cadet 2nd Lieutenant 

ORTON E. DULING Cadet 1st Sergeant 

II UGH G . FORTNE Y Cadet Sergeant 

JOHN L. STEWART Cadet Sergeant 

CADET CORPORALS 

Joseph A. Conner C. R. Foltz 

L. S. Lewellen ('. M. Shafer 

CADET MUSICIAN 
R. M. Bobbitt 



230 




231 




PROFESSOR S. B. BKOWN 
as a Student at W. V. U. 



T.Vl 




fl 



That everyone wants to be beautiful is a well known 
fact, liut to some extent, beauty is like greatness. Some 
people are born beautiful, some acquire beauty, and some 
have beauty thrust upon them. This article deals with the 
second part of the quotation, "How to acquire beauty." 
There are a great many things that make people beautiful, 
but only a few shall be considered. 

The dimple should and shall be taken up first, for of 
all the enticing, bewitching, attractive, and engaging fea- 
tures. tin 1 dimple is the one that heads the list. A man with 
such an attraction is fervently adored by all Co-Eds in 
West Virginia. The methods of acquiring the dimple arc 
numerous, hut they are all perfectly PAINLESS. The PRE- 
CEDING illustration tell better than words, the methods of 
attaining dimples. Should any one he doubtful let him 
apply to Roy Hall for further information. 

Another great aid to Social Success is curly hair. Il" 
gives one a coquettish look, and always makes him appear 
younger than he really is. and that is no little help in this 
day and age 

There are many and varied ways in vogue, but they 
are all painful in the extreme; such, for instance, as rolling 
the hair in curl papers or kids, or using the curling tongs. 
These are very tedious, and have many disadvantages. If 



. As Recommended by 
Some Members of W. V. U. 



the hair is rolled on papers or kids, there is no hope of 
sleep for the martyr; disturbing dreams are his lot. Then 
if the tongs are used, there is very often a blistered fore- 
head. None of these disadvantages are found in the follow- 
ing method. It is easy; up-to-date, and produces lasting 




results. In fact the operation has to he repeated every six 
months. Get a bottle of glue, common, ordinary, every-day 
glue, and thoroughly saturate the hair, then curl each in- 
dividual strand in the desired way, and let the whole thing- 
dry. The accompanying illustration shows the happy re- 
sults obtained bv "Curly" Watkins. 



233 



The last beauty hint to be discussed is one of extreme 
interest. Everybody wants to know how to remove superflu- 
ous hair from the face. Tn all the newspapers there are 
advertisements of remedies to cure these unsightly disfigure- 
ments. Most of the old-style remedies are harmful in the 
extreme. The electric needle is a painful and tedious pro- 
cess, as are all the other old eures. and they are by no 
means as satisfactory as the one following. 

No explanation is necesfeary, for "Buck" King has 
been kind enough to have a picture made for us to illus- 
trate th" method. Study the picture carefully and you will 
sec what a delightful, simple, and easy way it is to remove 
superfluous hair. 

•lack Hare has been asked to write an article on how co 
grow hair on bald heads. I lis method has been successfully 
used by Reggie Cummins, hut as it is not quite ready, it 
shall be treated in a later issue of the paper. Wishing 
yon all good luck in your endeavors, 

T remain yours truly, 

Tin; Beauty Doctor. 



Healthful Hints I" Beauty Seekers. 

To preserve the skin — "Tan it." 

To remove freckles— "A buckel of quicklime." 

Tn whiten the skin "Cold .Medal Flour." 

To keep the hair clean "Try washing it." 

To have dainty little feet "Use an ax." 

Tn cultivate rosy checks "Ea1 beets." 

To remove corns permanently — "A buzz saw." 




:•::] 




"Meow! Meow! Meow!" which is feline for "Listen to 
this mournful tale of woe." You've heard of cat-tails, no 
doubt.' Well, this is one. I have seen a good many funny 
things about this Hall, since T crawled through the parlor 
window last November; and 1 have enjoyed my hibernation 
among these old girls — pardon me — young college ladies — in 
spite of the fact that I have on various occasions of busi- 
ness meetings, on the third floor and elsewhere, lost eight 
of my nine lives. Yet there is a daily scene enacted here 
which never fails to amuse me. I give it here as a sugges- 
tion to the University Dramatic Club. 

Time— 8:25 A. M. Plac< — Woman's Hall. Characters 
—Majority of Hall inmates, discovered, mussing up the par- 
lor curtains, flattening their noses against the parlor win- 
dows, and front door glass, or draped over the front porch 
railing. An eager expectant look on every face. One digni- 
fied member pacing the front porch with a vindictive, blood- 
thirsty expression. 

S . hurrying down the stairs — "Do you seehiniyet?" 



een tip tf)e J|all Cat 



Discouraged chorus — "lie's not even up to the Phi 
Psi House." 

G 



: "Come on »irls, I have an eight-thirty class." 
Joyous Chorus: "There he is!" 
II : "Well I hope that I get that cheek." 

C : "He ought to have two letters for me. I 

didn't get any yesterday." 

G— — : Well, if I subscribed to a daily. I wouldn't 
mind waiting." 

Chorus, mournfully: "lie's disappeared!" 

Ten minutes later half the "iris depart, leaving instruc- 
tions to have their mail brought to them. 

One minute later. 

I). M. (Dignified member): "There's that aggravating 
man. sitting on the front porch across the street, talking to 
tile hoys." 

B — — : "Are you all going? Yes, I'll bring your mail 
if I can carry it all." All leave hut B- - and I). M 



235 



After ten minutes, postman comes leisurely up the 

walk. 

D - M\: "Do you think 1 have time to wait all day for 
my mail.' I'm going to see that you are discharged." 
H : "Do hurry! Please!" 



P. M. silently places on the table two papers and an 
advertisement addressed to the Dean of Women. 
Quick curtain. 
Meows from behind the piano. 




'You may think I am stuck' on this writing job but 
allow me to assure yon that ii is not as soft as it seems." 

II. C. 



236 




237 




PRESIDENT'S HOUSE 




MARTIN HALL 




(' \MITK SCKNK 




CAMPUS SCENE 




WOODBUKN HALL 



242 




SCIENCE HALL 




MECHANIC \l, MALI. 




LIBRARY 




TIIK "CIUCUO 




THE ARMORY 



247 




248 









249 




"AT THE BATH - 




250 




251 



Ol)e .Att)UUc yboavb of Control 

PROF. H. S. GREEN, Chairman. 
Recently succeeded by Prof. C. W. Waggoner 

Prof. A. W. Chez Prof. A. W. Nolan 

Lieut. W. S. Weeks Prof. D. M. Willis 

STUDENTS 
Joe Grubb C. C. Burritt 

Charles Hodges E. H. Beardsley 

R. C. Posten 



LT.L' 





253 



T3I)£ JPbot yball Score for 1910 

At Date Teams 

Morgantown Oct. 1 W. V. U...6 Westminster College.. 

Morgantown Oct. 15 W. V. U.. .0 Bethany College 

Morgantown Oct. 22 W. V. U. . . Bucknell College 9 

Wheeling Nov. 12 W. V. U.. .9 Bethany College 

Philadelphia Oct. 8 W. V. U.. .0 Univ. of Penna 38 

Parkersburg Oct. 29 W. V. U. . . 5 Marietta College 10 

Pittsburg Nov. 5 W. V. U...0 Univ. of Pittsburg 38 

GAMES CANCELLED 

Morgantown Nov. 16 W. V. U. — West Virginia Wesleyan 

Fairmont Nov. 19 W. V. U. — Dickinson College 

Washington, Pa Nov. 24 W. V. U. — Washington and Jefferson 



254 









* # * § f J | 






/".'•*■* 


4 

15 






] 


!*• 


♦ 


S~ ^ ^sw-"^*^ 


f^"^iW 


f 


^ 












•/BAR 


■ 






^ot^ilTio^ <wi<ftM,.i«i\o 



fe $ ft % **.* 



: ? *{$* 



5? «® £§» 



K7yym3 




CAPTAIN RUDOLPH MUNK 



257 



N MEMORY OF 

RVDOLPH MVNK 

1889 — 19.10 
CAPTAIN FOOT BALL TEAM 1910 

FATALLY INJURED IN BETHANY GAME 
NOV. 12, 1910 AT WHEEI ING. W. VA 



258 




KING— TACKLE 




SPEER— END 




259 



FLOYD— GUARD 





TYLER— CENTER 




BOYLES TACKLE 



260 



AMOS— TACKLE 




MAC RAE— END 




CONAWAY- GUARD 




TAYLOR— FULLBACK 




261 



KINSEY— HALFBACK 




BELL— HALFBACK 
Captain-Elect, '11 




KICK-OFF HKTHANY GAMF 



:m;l' 



Z3be baseball Score for 1910 



At 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Philadelphia 
Maryland A 
Georgetown 
Annapolis . 
Annapolis . 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Notre Dame 
Westerville 
Wooster . . 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 



Apr. 16 W. 

Apr. 22 W. 

Apr. 23 W. 

Apr. 27 W. 

■■. College Apr. 28 W. 

Apr. 29 W. 

Apr. 30 W. 

Apr. 30 W. 

May 4 W. 

May 6 W. 

May 9 W. 

May 14 W. 

May 19 W. 

May 20 W. 

May 21 W. 

May 27 W. 

May 28 W. 

May 30 W. 

June 1 W. 

June 1 W. 

June 4 \Y. 

June 8 W. 



Date Teams 

.Apr. 15W.V.U... 7 Bethany College 4 

V. U... 7 Bethany College 

V. U. . . 7 Wheeling 8 

V. U... 1 Wheeling 4 

V. U... U. of P 6 

V. U... 1 Maryland Agr. Col... 3 

V. U. . . 3 Georgetown 4 

V. U... 6 St. John's 4 

V. U... Navy 2 

V. U... 5 Marshall College 2 

V. U. .. 6 Westminster College. 5 

V. U...10 Westminster College. 4 

V. U... 5 Otterbein College 4 

V. U... 6 W. & J 3 

V. U... 5 W. & J 4 

V. U... 2 W. & J 3 

V. U... 7 W. Va. Wesleyan 3 

V. U... 4 Bucknell College 6 

V. U... . 2 Bucknell College 7 

V. U. . . 3 Notre Dame 7 

V. U... Otterbein College 7 

V. U... 5 Wooster College 1 

V. U... 6 Hiram College 4 

.June 11W.V.U... 7 Ohio Northern 

.June 15 W. V. U.. . 2 Alumni 1 



131)* Scb*6ule for 1911 



AT HOME 



April 8 — University of Pittsburg 
April 14 and 15 — Carnegie Tech 
April 21 and 22 — Wheeling of the Central League 
May 5 and 6 — Allegheny College 
May 11, 12 and 13 — Washington and Jefferson 
May 17 — Marshall College 
May 20 — Marietta College 
May 24 — Keio College 
May 26 — West Virginia Wesleyan 
May 27 — Morris Harvey College (The Reserves) 
May 30 — Denison College 
June 9 and 10 — Open 
June 13 — Commencement, Alumni 

ABROAD 

April 24 — University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia 

April 25 — Manhattan College, at New York City 

April 26 — Princeton College, at Princeton, N. J. 

April 27— Maryland A. C, at College Park, Md. 

April 28 — Eastern College, at Manassas, Va. 

April 29 — Navy, at Annapolis, Md. 

June 2 — Ohio University, at Athens, Ohio 

June 3 — Marshall College, at Huntington, W. Va. 



263 




BASKBAIX SQUAD I'.tll 




TEAM 1910 




CAPTAIN IICTCHIXSOX 




COACH McCLTJRE 



266 




AIcMINN AT THE BAT 




JACK BLAIR AT THE BAT 



267 




GYM TEAM 




STEVENS 
Marathon Runner 





WEAVER 



MORRIS 



269 





TR \('K TEAM 



.MARATHON 





^^k 












ST \I(T 1<ki YARD DASH 



TRACK SCiUAI) 



270 





LAMBDIN 
Track Captain 1910 




McCLURE 
Shot Put 



271 



MORRIS 
Hammer Throw 



BASEBALL LETTERS 



Kee 


Wyatt 


Merrill 


Hutchinson 


Vandale 


Riddle 


Mo Minn 


Munk 


Vass 


Wylie 


Boone 





FOOTBALL LETTERS 



Taylor 


Bell 


Tyler 


Kinsey 


Floyd 


Speer 


Conaway 





L. L. McClure 

A. B. Lambdin 

J. H. Riddle 

X. P. Weaver 



J. T. Morris 
L. L. McClure 

J. T. Stevens 



MacRae 

King 

Amos 



TRACK LETTERS 

First Place 
J. T. Stevens J. T. Morris 



Second Place 
H. D. Pocock 



W. Lively 



INTER-CLASS NUMERALS 



.1. II. Riddle 
X. B. Crowl 



A. B. Lambdin 
E. F. Heiskell 



272 



Henry Sherwood Green, A.B., Li.D. 



It is generally conceded that a large part of a college 
education is gained, not by the actual work in the class- 
room, but by the association with the inspiration gained 
from the men who compose the faculty. Our own school is 
especially favored in the opportunity offered for such asso- 
ciations. Noteworthy in this respect is Professor Henry 
Sherwood Green, of the Department of Greek, who by his 
kindness, and interest in the work of those students under 
him has gained the thorough respect of all. 

Henry Sherwood Green was born at New Milford, Con- 
necticut, on November 1*2. 1854. He prepared for Yale at 
Williamson Seminary, Easthampton, Massachusetts, enter- 
ing college in 1875. At Yale Dr. Green was actively con- 
nected with all departments of student activities. He was 
on the editorial staff of the Yale "Courant," and in his 
Senior year, was on the Board of the "Yale Literary Mag- 
azine.'' This is the oldest, college paper in the country, 
and to be an editor of it is one of the greatest honors to be 
gained by an undergraduate at Yale. Dr. Green rowed on 
the famous '79 crew of Yale during his entire four years. 
He was also otherwise interested in athletics. He was a 
member of the Senior Soeietv, "The Skull and Bones," and 



a member of Psi Upsilon. He received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts in 1ST!). At the Commencement of appoint- 
ments, he was one of the honor men. 

Leaving college Dr. Green spent a number of years 
teaching in various colleges and preparatory schools. In 
1896 he was elected Professor of Greek in Bethany College, 
and four years later he was called to the Chair of Greek 
in West Virginia University. Dr. Green is closely allied 
with all the various University interests. He is Chairman 
of the Athletic Board of Control. He is a member of the 
Committee on Athletics. He is a member of the English 
Club. When the local Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was 
established, Dr. Green was honored by election to member- 
ship, in the Chapter organization. In 1901 Bethany Col- 
lege conferred on him the Honorary Degree of Doctor of 
Laws. 

Professor Green is a scholarly man. and a true gentle- 
man. All his work is characterized by a marked liberality. 
He is the type of man whose memory the student loves to 
carry away with him when he leaves college, so that in after 
years he may look back upon it as a most profitable and 
pleasant association. 



273 



Dennis Clark. -'I sure is glad I ain't a student." 
Posten. "So arc the students.'* 



* * * 



Fair one, effusively. "Oh, John, are you still here?" 

Judge Wilkinson. "No -Madam, you mistake. I'm 
siill standing up on top of the Union Utility Building, 
playing pinochle with the cupola." 

* * * 



Lonnie Ryan. "I take hard courses in the winter, so 
they will let me have easy ones in the spring." 

".Mu^s" Hodges. What do yon have in the winter, 
Paddy?" 

Lonnie. "Oh, I take a little Economics, and some 

Geology." 

* * * 

Miss Moore, '"dust look at thai lai log adding." 

Emily. "Adding? How do you mean. .Miss Moore.'" 
Miss Moore. "Well, he puts down one and carries 



three." 



» * * 



Mac. "] don't think thai I'll take that girl to the 



dance 



Sinn. 
.Mac 
Slim. 



•Why lint ?" 

Well, you sec. I have 1 n bowline, and 



<>h. she'll go DO matter how hold you are. 



Seniors. 

Kindly fill in the following blank and return it by Feb- 
ruary 21 1911 



Full name SAMUEL BIERS 

Degree LL.B. 

Fraternity The Great Unwashed 



Class Senior 



Clubs and Organizations of which a member 

Kone, THAUK ftODl 



Offices held 1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

Part in Alhletics with the year 



Remarks 



>brjV'- c t~ W~*r4&L 



<Xa^*~i_ 



fio— X 



(Signature) 



274 



Kaler. "There's safety in numbers." 

Cummins. "Wrong again." 

Kaler. "How's that*" 

Reggie. "This is my sixty-eight hair tonic." 

Kaler. "Well?" 

Reggie. "I'm still dangerously bald." 



* * * 



Mary Holroyd. "No. I don't have the third period 
vacant. You see, Buck don't have a class then either." 

* * * 
King on the way to the postoffice. "Any mail?" 
Pugh. "I am." 
K "Am what?" 
Pugh. "Male." 

* * * 

J. Riddle in History 10. "Themistocles made a speech 
to the Megarians, but they told him to keep his head shut. 
so when he got his lunch hooks on some muzuma he packed 
up his doll rags and beat it back to Italy." 




PROMISING MATERIAL 



275 



Helen. "Are yon going to the library this afternoon, 
\ T ell?" 

Nell. "No I'm going to study." 



.Miss Wilson, giving her views on slang: "I think it's 
something fierce the way sonic professors use slang. People 
are getting aext to them now. I think that it's up to them 
either to let up." 

Brown Hodges. •■Where do we get the work Hunky?" 

Caldwell. 'Thai's easy. It's a corruption of the word 
! [ungarian. " 

B. II. "Well, then where do we get the word Dago. 
Thai doesn 'I come from Italian. " 

('. 'That's easier. It's a corruption of a sunset." 



Turner. Looking for a loan. "Ike, how much money 
have yon.'" 

Moran. "-lini. I was horn without a cen1 and I have 

ii yet." 

* * * 

Posten, to Freshman. "Why do they say that in the 
Spring a t ree comes to life .' " 

Freshman. "I don 't know. " 

Posten. "Well, because it barks as it is leaving, and 
leaves its trunk- for board." 




276 




T. M. and M. T. 
Prom Life. 



277 




278 




SEEN ON THE SOPH BOAT RIDE 



279 





Advice to a college widow: "Don't 
try to teach an old do;; new tricks, 
better catch 'em young." 



THE SAME (JIUL BY DIFFERENT ARTISTS 



L'SII 




THE UNIVERSITY CABIN 




K K G HOUSE PARTY AT CHEAT 



281 




<<_. 



282 




283 



Tii8 Yollovv CjQy/n 


♦ 


PRIZE STORY 

RHEA W. WARDEN 



The many lights of the armory shown merrily down on 
the dancers at the Junior "Prom." There were men in 
black and men in the cadet gray with brass trappings and 
swords. There wciv girls in white, dressed with girlish 
simplicity, and girls in brightly colored gowns with jewels. 
A happy throng. And the music was happy and now and 
then a dancer hummed a part of the tune that swayed the 
crowd. 

"Dwight, don't you just adore that melody?" asked 
Eleanor Kraddock. 

■Yes." said Graham, "but I was thinking how well 
that yellow rose looks with your yellow gown." 

"Flatterer again." laughed Eleanor. 

"Vanity, thy name is woman," mocked Dwight. "1 
was flattering the rose." 

It was Dwight Graham's fifth dance with Eleanor, and 
he would gladly have daii 1 them all had fashion not de- 
creed that he should dance mice in a while with another 
man's partner. "In order," as Dwight expressed it, "that 
the other man might have at least one delightful dance." 

During the intermission Dwight left the armory for a 
smoke and for a breath of fresh air. He slipped away from 
the groups of men around the entrance, for his thoughts 
were company enough. He sal on a cannon, feet swinging, 
and cigarette end making a little point of light in the dark- 
nes. The music of the dance still sounded in his ears and 
his head was in a whirl from the lights, the swinging crowd 
— and Eleanor. 



"People might say it is just a college case," he thought, 
"but by .links, I believe I've got it and got it had!" He 
grinned sheepishly to himself in the darkness. 

Suddenly his mood changed. The cigarette dropped 
unheeded. He was staring at a window of the Armory. 
The window looked upon a winding stair that led from a 
small ante-room to the gallery. Two figures stood out faint- 
ly against the dim light of the little room. The man was 
a cadet, an officer as his sword showed, and when his pro- 
file was tinned to the window, Dwight recognized Homer 
Smith. The girl was — surely not — yes — she was Eleanor's 
size and she wore a yellow gown. Suddenly Dwight jumped 
from the cannon with an exclamation. The two on the stair 
had apparently not noticed the window, for the girl had 
paused and turned to the man who was one step below her. 
Vbies filtered from the gallery above, a tinkle of ice cups 
and faint music came from the ball room, the stair was 
empty save for the two, the light was dim, and for a sec- 
ond the two silhouettes became one. 

When Dwight reached the hall room the dancers were 
assembling for the next dance. 

"If I can find another girl in yellow." mused Dwight. 

Bui search as he might there were but two girls in 
yellow. Eleanor Kraddock and Ethel Wynne. Ethel was 
much too tall for the girl on the stairs, so it must have 
been Eleanor. 

Dwight was angry and hurl. "Hang it." he thought, 
"I'll ask her. I have the right to know." 



284 



It was the eleventh dance, and his dance. "Eleanor," 
he asked, "would you mind missing' this waltz? I have 
something' to ask you. Shall we walk?" 

"Yes." Eleanor looked surprised at his serious tone. 
but let him throw her cloak around her. 

Outside, they walked half the length of the cement 
walk in silence. Then Dwight stopped abruptly. 

"Eleanor, I have something to ask you." 

"Yes?" 

"Probably I've no right to — I think I have — Eleanor 
— did Homer Smith kiss you?" 

' ' Dwight ! ' ' 

"I know, I"— 

' ' Dwight Graham ! ' ' 

"Well?" 

"What can yjou mean? I should think you would 
know me better than that." 

"I saw it through the window. The girl wore a yellow 
dress — " 

"But surely there are others in yellow. I was not even 
with him during the intermission." There was a trace of 
tears in the voice. 

"She was your size, and the only other girl in yellow 
is Ethel Wynne. It was not Ethel." 

The trace of tears vanished. "Mr. Graham, let us go 
back, I shall not discuss it with you." 

They walked to the Armory in silence. They had sev- 
eral more dances together, but the affair on the stairs was 
not mentioned again. 

Eleanor was worried. She could think of no solution 
to the puzzle. 

"If I could find out who was with Homer during the 
intermission," said Eleanor to herself. "I don't know how 
I could do it, though. Who — why, how stupid of me — it 



must have been Harriet Yoss. Homer is just crazy about 
her. But — how am I to ask her? It may have been sonic 
one else and Harriet might ask me why I wanted to know. 
I just think I'll ask her anyway. If it is someone else she 
ought to know it, for I believe she is as crazy about him as 
he is about her. 

Eleanor could find no time to talk to Harriet that eve- 
ning, so the next morning she went to Harriet's room. She 
hardly knew how to bring up the subject. "I don't be- 
lieve I'll ask her if she was with him during the intermission. 
She might think I saw them, and deny it all." "Harriet," 
she began, "I don't want to hurt your feelings, but I think 
I should tell you something — something that you won't like 
I am afraid, but they are saying it about Homer. They say 
be kissed a girl at the 'Prom.' last night — a girl in a yel- 
low dress — it was on the stairs — " 

"He didn't," cried Harriet. "I mean she didn't have 
on a yellow dress. He kissed me. My dress was white." It 
was out before she thought. "Oh, what have I said, Eleanor 
— you won't tell, will you? You must not. I don't want 
people to know we are engaged. Please!" 

"But the yellow gown?" asked Eleanor. 

"I don't know — but I was with him on the stairs and 
he kissed me." 

"Harriet, won't you let me tell Dwight? He — be 
thinks — Homer kissed me. He is angry. If he promised 
not to tell?" 

"Oh, Eleanor, please don't. You know be couldn't 
keep it. He would promise, but he'd be sure to let it slip 
sometime." Harriet sank on the bed in a crumpled heap, 
and Eleanor went to her room. 

That afternoon there was to be a ball game. Eleanor 
was "blue." She knew Dwight would not ask her to go 
and they had not missed a game that season. She shut her- 



285 



self in her room for fear the other girls might ask her to 
go with them. She wanted to be miserable. 

Dwight was rather out of sorts with the world in gen- 
eral, as he walked slowly toward the athletic field. His 
hands were thrust deep into his pockets, and he stared at the 
ground as he walked. He reached the Armory and as he 
passed the cannon the memories of the night before came 
to him. He paused and glanced up at the window. For 
a moment he stared, blinking, then with a whoop he turned 
and made for Woman's Hall. 

He smiled to himself as hi' strode along. Once he 
laughed outright. He passed two young girls who turned 
and giggled. 

Once at the Hall he asked for Eleanor. She came down 
with eyes slightly red. Dwight 's excitement checked her 
coo] greeting. 



"Eleanor," he said, "for the sake of old times. I want 
you to do me a favor. Come with me. I have something 
to show you. It is not far." 

""Well," she said, "I don't understand — but I'll go." 

They walked up Spruce street and Eleanor began to 
catch some of Dwight 's enthusiasm. They went down 
Prospect street and Eleanor smiled in response to Dwight 's 
lively talk. At the Armory they stopped. 

Eleanor "'lanced at the cannon and then looked at 
Dwight enquiringly. For answer he looked at the window. 
Her glance followed his. for a short time she gazed without 
understanding. Then, sluddenly there were tears in her 
eyes and a glad light in her face. She turned to Dwight 
and their eyes met in an all comprehending look. The win- 
dow was yellow glass. 




286 



Ail 




uoxoooco* 



vSmvvmo 



;5 



SECOND PRIZE STORY 

L. J. BERNSTEIN 



"Mamma, is papa going to Mirgorod tomorrow?" 
called a little voice eagerly from the bed on which in the 
dimness of the room, three fair little heads lying in a row, 
could be distinguished. 

"Yes, my dear, if we live and are well," the mother 
answered. 

"And will he bring me some nice things from town?" 

"Certainly, if you will be a good boy," the woman an- 
swered, with a sigh. "Poor children," she said in an un- 
dertone, "they have not seen a plaything for I do not know 
how long. But how — " 

The child 1 did not let her continue. 

"I want a harmonicon. little horses, a cow, and — and — 
oh, mamma," he exclaimed, eagerly, "I want soldiers, and 
— . " But he did not name anything else, his little mind 
was evidently occupied marshalling his soldiers. 

Anna Petrovna's fingers that were knitting a stocking 
moved in a slow mechanical way. The child's mention of 
Mirgorod and his desire for things which he seldom got, 
brought up many painful thoughts. Pictures of a careless 
and happy childhood, of a content girlhood, then of a 
romantic love affair, of a quiet happy marriage, and finally 
of her present life, all moved before her like a panorama, 
bright and harmonious at first, but losing its beauty as the 
scenes moved on, and terminating in the ugly picture and 
disfigured by poverty and privations. She was reflecting 
on her past and present, and was trying to look into the 



future where she saw very little sunshine, indeed. Presently 
her thoughts were interrupted. 

"Mamma, I am cold," said the little voice. 

Anna Petrovna went to the lied and tried to cover the 
little children a little better. 

"Now lie down and go to sleep, and papa will bring 
you many nice things tomorrow." 

She kissed him tenderly on the fair little head. The 
child smiled contentedly and nestled snugly in the scanty 
bed-clothes. 

"Surely it is cold," xVnna Petrovna said, as she 
turned away from the bed. She went up to the oven, and 
stooping down, gathered the last armful of straw that lay 
on the ground, and shoved it into the oven. 

"As if this will help any," she said. 

Just as the straw was catching tire a gust of wind 
blew in the chimney and forced a cloud of heavy, dark-blue 
smoke into the room. The smoke made Anna Petrovna 
cough. 

"Ah. such a life," she said, quite audibly. 

"You are complaining, mother." said a boy of about 
nineteen, who was all this time sitting at the table and read- 
ing or trying to read in the dim light of the small lamp, 
in a book, a relic of happier days. His voice was soft and 
low, yet the woman heard in it a tone of gentle reproach. 
She went up to the boy and put her arms around his neck. 

"Oh, my son, my son," she cried as tears began to gush 
hot and bitter from her eyes. Ivan gently freed himself 



287 



from his mother's embrace, seated her on his chair and be- 
gan to pace the room. 

Was there reason for his mother's complaining? Ivan 
looked around. lie knew the house well. He had lived in 
it since a child. Yet as lie now paced the room, he observed 
everything critically as if it wrvc all new to him. lie ob- 
served the one room that served as kitchen, dining-room, 
living-room and bed-room, with one nook separated by a 
curtain, the sleeping chamber of the parents. He observed 
the old dilapidated furniture; the uneven »round; the oven, 
old and full of cracks through which the smoke and the 
heavy <rases escaped into the room. He observed the damp, 
loamy walls, in two or three places broken by small win- 
dows; and above all the low ceiling. Was there reason 
enough? Even this boy who had lived nearly all his life in 
that house and who had become accustomed to the surround- 
ings ,thought so. No. he could not reproach his mother. 

And yet. there was something telling [van that the poor 
life they were living was not what distressed his mother that 
evening. Ever since they had moved into that house their 
mode of life had been practically the same; and yet he 
could not recall that his mother had complained. She 
always bore her fate so heroically; and he could not see why 
she should break down all at once. Surely there is another 
reason, he thought. And he determined to find out. He 
went over to the table on which Anna Petrovna was lean- 
in", lie looked at her intently for awhile, then he stooped 
oyer and kissed her head. She raised her red. tearful eyes 
,ind looked inquiringly al her son. 

"'.Mother." [van began, "as far back as I can remember 
yon have never complained of our poor life before. You 
have always borne your lot quietly and always tried to 
cheer father and me in our hardships. Why is it. then, this 
evening, rather than at any other time, yon suddenly com- 



plain.' I am sure there is something that caused you to 
utter those words; words which I have never heard before 
and which I hoped never to hear. Can you trust me. dear 
mother? Is there nothing 1 can do in this case that would 
lighten your burden even a little? Come, tell me." and he 
looked at her with entreating eyes. 

Anna Petrovna remained silent for awhile. She looked 
Over the room and then sighing, spoke more to herself than 
to Ivan. 

"To think that for such a life one should have to sacri- 
fice his honor." 

"What are you saying, mother.'" Ivan cried, frighten- 
ed. "I cannot see how our honor suffers through our work- 
ing in Kuzmitchin 's null." 

"Ah. my son. you do not. but it nevertheless is so. We 
pay dearly for the work, alas too dearly." 

"You frighten me, mother. Tell me all. quickly." 

"Do you know, my son." Anna Petovna asked, "that 
your father is going to Mirgorod tomorrow.'" 

"Of course. I do. He is going to give his evidence in 
the Kuzmitchin Ijoboleuke case." 

"Well if he uiies and gives the evidence Kuzmitchin ex- 
pects him to give, it will be false edivence." 

"What!" Ivan was as one suddenly awakening from 
a strange dream. He could not grasp the reality of the 
fearful declaration. 

"Your father and 1," Anna Petrovna went on. "hoped 
to be able to keep this secret from yon: to save you from 
the shame and torture of knowing what a crime your father 
is about to commit, what an awful price he is about to pay 
for a piece of bread for his children. Put. alas, I am too 
weak, 1 cannot keep this burning secret in my heart any 
longer and I must disclose it to yon. Kuzmitchin is the 
guilty man in the Kurzmiehin-Loboleuko case. Your father 



L'SS 



is the only outside person who knows the truth. But on the 
peril of losing his employment and you yours, he is com- 
pelled to give evidence in favor of Kurzmitehen. And he is 
to perjure his soul to withhold the guilty one from justice 
and probably bring disaster iipon an innocent family." 

"But mother, how can father agree to such a shameful 
and sinful act, how can you?" The hoy cried perceiving at 
last the situation. 

"Your father and I, my son, have often and long con- 
sidered the situation. At times T have almost succeeded in 
persuading him not to do it. But the thought of the mis- 
ery and suffering that is awaiting us at the hands of that 
heartless man. should your father refuse to give the evi- 
dence, always led him to decide upon the deed. God knows 
how your father abhors even the thought of the act, but he 
decided to do it for the sake of his children. 

"I have almost grown accustomed to the thought. But 
this innocent child's mention of the hateful Mirgorod makes 
me realize the nearness of the crime. I see it in all its 
shame and horror, and my soul cries out against it. I know 
the source of mental anguish and torture it will lie on your 
father. Oh. that we shall all have to suffer so much!" 

The woman could not restrain her tears any longer and 
wept bitterly. 

Ivan again began to pace the room impatiently. He 
longed for the morning when he would be able to see his 
father and talk to him. Numberless thoughts were rush- 
ing confusedly through his brain. But the most definite, 
the predominating, the central thought, was that of pre- 
venting his father from going to Mirgorod. Impulsive by 
nature and imbued with the thoughts of the Russian youth, 
his contempt for Kuzmitchin was now very great, and he 
craved for the moment when he and his father would show 
Kuzmitchin their independence and laugh at his threats. 



That his father would at last refuse to comply with Kuz- 
mitchin 's wishes, was the only thing Ivan expected, so strong 
appeared to him the arguments he was going to use with 
his father. Furthermore, he was already preparing a sharp, 
cutting speech which he would deliver to Kuzmitchin the 
next day. Thus, rushing from one unfinished thought to 
another thought, from one half-formed phrase to another 
phrase, his mind labored on hour after hour. 

Not another word passed that night between mother 
and son on that hateful subject. "When the night was al- 
ready far advanced. Anna Petrovno arose from her leaning 
position on the table. She quietly approached the bed 
where the children lay. There she stood for a time looking 
at their fair heads, then, having kissed them lightly but 
tenderly, and having bid Ivan a good night, she retired. 
She was weary in body and spirit, and so, it did not take 
long for her to fall into a heavy sleep. 

Ivan still continued walking up and down the room, 
forming plans in his disturbed mind. After a time, how- 
ever, he sat down by the table, leaned his head on it and 
soon fell into an uneasy slumber. 

It was a real Russian cold winter night. A dry, keen, 
cutting wind was blowing, moving at a great speed and with 
tremendous force, stopping, as it seemed, only here and 
there to raise a whirl of crisp snow and carry it in his 
course. Now and then he came in conflict with the straw 
roof of a house or stable and in such a case he was almost 
always the victor. For after the encounter quantities of 
straw would most frequently move on in his savage 
triumphal possession. Dark clouds chased each other over 
the moonless sky and finally disappear below the horizon. 
making room for others that were constantly rising in the 
opposite direction. It was a night when no one likes to go 



289 



out, Jiiid when tin- children most enjoy to gather around the 
grandfather or the grandmother, close to the oven, and lis 
ten to strange stories of wizards and witches, "hosts and evil 
spirits; while the lamentable wail of the wind in the chim 
ney adds to the awfulness of the stories. 

In this most unpleasant night two muzhiks, muffled in 
'kerchiefs, their fur caps well drawn over their ears, were 
following a sled drawn by a hard-breathing horse. The load 
on the sled was covered with flour sacks and seemed rather 
light, hut on account of the wind and deep snow the horse 
plodded on slowly. The muzhiks were silent save for the 
"Nil. Nu"' with which they urged on the horse now and 
then, and which words were no sooner uttered than they 
were caughl by the wind and carried off into space. 

Soon the two men came in front of Anna Petrovna's 
house. Here they halted and one of them approached the 
dimly lighted window and knocked. 

*"Ei, 1am. vitchinia skorenko!" 

A hurried movemeiil was heard from within. The door 
opened and [van appeared, followed soon by Anna Pat- 
rovna. The two muzhiks \\iTi' busy about the sled. 

"Whal a iiiehl!" remarked one. "All the evil spirits 
miisi have been turned loose." 

Presently they lifted the load on the sled and carried 
it tn the door. Unconscious, slid not understanding whal 
was going on. Anna Petrovna and Ivan allowed the men to 
l.ass and then followed them into the house. Cautiously 
the Muzhiks laid their burden on the old sofa and uncovered 
it. For awhile mother and son stared al the objed on the 
sofa, then the whole truth Hashed through their minds in 
an instant, and with a heartrendering cry they fell beside 
the sofa. They were weeping over the motionless body of 
Ilia Maksimavitch Perroff. 



*"Ho, there, open quickly!" 



After a time Ivan collected himself and asked the muz- 
hiks what it all means. They told him that as they were 
working in the mill they had suddenly heard the report of 
a gun in the story above them. They had rushed up there 
and found the night watch. Ilia .Maksimavitch. writhing on 
the floor. They had looked around hut could not Hud any 
^•un or any other person wdio could have fired the shot. 
I 'pon more diligent searching, however, they found in a 
distant pile of sacks, a revolver which, upon examination, 
showed that it had just been discharged. They had im- 
mediately procured a horse and sled, and had taken Pet- 
roff home. They said also that a man was sent to the 
hospital for the doctor and that they thought that it was 
time for him to come. 

The doctor was not long in coming. After a thorough 
examination he said that the wound was fatal and that he 
doubted that Petroff would live even to daylight. Mean- 
while the doctor tried to bring him to consciousness. 

How slowly the hours of the fearful night dragged on. 
Anna Petrovna sat on a chair by the table, her face buried 
in her arms that rested on the table. She was exhausted 
and motionless as the body of her beloved husband, save 
for the sudden convulsions which now and then shook her 
whole frame. The three little children had been awakened 
by the tumuli and were now standing by their mother be- 
wildered and trembling with cold, [van was restless. After 
the stupor into which he had at first fallen, his mind began 
to work rapidly. There was evidently a greal conflict go- 
ing on within him. his spirit seemed to he struggling and 
trying to force its way out. bu1 by an almost superhuman 

efforts succeeded in holding it ill check. 

Everybody in the house seemed to be depressed; the 
doctor gave instructions to Ins assistant in undertones while 
the neighbors who had gathered in the house all preserved 



290 



silence. Only when the howl of a dog outside once rose 
above the wind did the muzhiks cross themselves, and the 
whispers of "The sign of death" passed in an awful breath 
from man to man. 

In this awful suspense the night slowly wore away. It 
began to grow gray in the windows while the wind outside 
had somewhat subsided, with the approach of day a change 
came also in the condition of the wounded man and soon a 
whisper of relief passed through the gloomy house. Pet- 
roff opened his eyes. His wife and children gathered 
around him and he recognized them and smiled very faint- 



ly. Presently he made a slight motion with his head and 
his lips moved. Anna Petrovna put her lips close to his 
mouth but could not hear anything. Petroff lay quiet for 
awhile collecting strength for a last effort. His lips moved 
again, and this time Anna Petrovna heard him say, faintly: 

' ' Thank — God — I — not — go — to — Margorod. ' ' 

These were the last words of Ilia Maksimivitch Petroff. 
Another hour or two he hovered between life and death and 
then he breathed his last. His soul went before a more just 
tribunal. 




291 



The Editor takes this opportunity to thank those who 
have helped in the publication of this hook. He wishes to 
thank the •Junior Class for their ready response to his ap- 
peal for help, and lie especially desires to thank the artists, 
to whom the credit for a great deal of the hook's success de- 
pends. The Editor extends his hearty thanks to Rhea W. 
Warden, Margaret Hopwood, Horace Meldahl, George H. 
Viewig, Pearl Louise Reiner, C. II. Watkins. Jr., and Fred 
R. Koelz. 



292 




293 



INDEX 



Paoe 

Alpha Xi Delta 153-156 

Areopagus 148-149 

Armory 247 

As Seen by the Hall Cat 235-236 

Athenaeum 202-203 

At the Bath 250 

Athletics 251 

Football . . 253-262 

Coach Lender 256 

Captain Munk 257 

Captain Munk Memorial 258 

Football Letter Men 259 

Baseball 263 

Baseball Squad, 1911 264 

Baseball Schedule, 1911 263 

Captain Hutchinson 266 

Coach McClure 266 

Gym Team 268 

Beowulf Club 178-179 

Buildings 237 

President's House 238 

Martin Hall 239 

Campus Scene 240 

Campus Scene 241 

Woodburn Hall 242 

Science Hall 243 

Mechanical Hall 244 

Library 245 

The "Circle" 246 

The Armory 247 

Cadets 227-232 

Calendar 211-218 

Campus Scene 240-241 

Chi Omega 157-160 

Choral Society 208 

Circle, The 248 

Columbian Literary Society 180-181 

Dedication 6 

Delta Tau Delta 125-128 

Dramatic Club 195-198 

Editor's Own 225-226 

English Club 192 

Faculty 10-18 

Fraternities 103 

Beta Theta Pi 129-122 

Delta Tau Delta 125-128 

Kappa Alpha 121-124 

Kappa Psi 145-147 

Phi Kappa Sigma 117-120 



Paue 

Phi Kappa Psi 105-108 

Phi Sigma Kappa 109-112 

Sigma Chi 113-116 

Sigma Nu 137-140 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 133-136 

Theta Nu Epsilon 141-143 

Phi Beta Kappa 165-168 

Freshmen 73 

Roll 74 

Picture 75 

History 76 

Green, Prof. H. S 276 

Greeting 5 

Gym Team 268 

Hodges, Pres.-elect, T. H 15 

How to be Beautiful 233-234 

Hutchinson, Captain 266 

In Memoriam — Rudolph Munk 88 

In Memoriam — Rudolph Munk 256 

Jokes 219-226 

Junior Class 43-68 

Officers 44 

Class 45-66 

History 67 

J unior Law 83 

Officers and Roll 84 

Picture 85 

History 86-87 

Junior Law Holiday Wagon 89 

Junior Week 91-102 

Kappa Alpha 121-12 1 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 161-164 

Kappa Psi 145-147 

Keyser Club 190 

Literature 283 

Marshall College Club 194 

McClure— Coach 266 

Martin Hall 239 

Masonic Club 174-175 

Mechanical Hall 244 

Monongalian 200-201 

Monticola, '11 204-205 

Mountain 107-171 

Munk, Captain 257 

Munk, Memorial 258 

Music 207-210 

Choral Society 208 

Music Graduates 42 

Orchestra 209 



Page 

Quartette 210 

Neil, Prof. C. E 7.9 

Orchestra 209 

Pan Hellenic Association of Wom- 
en's Fraternities 152 

Parthenon Literary Society 182-183 

Phi Beta Kappa 165-168 

Phi Kappa Psi 105-108 

Phi Kappa Sigma 117-120 

Phi Sigma Kappa 109-112 

President's House 238 

President Purinton 14 

President-elect Hodges 15 

Publications 199 

Quartette. The University 210 

R. J's. The 176-177 

Science Hall 243 

Seniors 19-42 

Officers 20 

Class 21-39 

History 40-41 

Music Graduates 42 

Senior Law 77-82 

Roll 78 

Picture 79 

History 80-82 

Sigma Chi 113-116 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 133-136 

Sigma Nu 137-140 

Society 91-102 

Societies and Clubs 169-198 

Sophomore Class 69-72 

Roll 70 

Picture 71 

History 72 

Sororities 151 

Alpha Xi Delta 153-1 56 

Chi Omega 157-160 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 161-164 

Sphinx 172-173 

Title Page 1 

T. N. E. Frat 141-143 

V. V. Club 191 

Weight of Authority 87 

Woman's League 184-185 

Woodburn Hall 242 

Y. M. C. A 186-187 

Y. W. C. A 188-189 



I here desire to offer my thanks to all those who have in any way 
contributed toward the success of this publication. The students as a 
whole have been responsive and willing to help. Mr. L. E. Friend, the 
official photographer, has been generous and courteous in all our deal- 1 
ings, and untiring in his efforts to get the photograph work done quickly 
and satisfactorily. The Acme Publishing Company have been patient 
and painstaking in their work and have put out an artistic book. The 
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Business Manager, 

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Commercial Branches Horticulture 


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Economics Latin Language 


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Education Latin Literature 


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Electrical Engineering Law 


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if you are interested in any regular or special course, Collegiate, Professional, Technical, Preparatory, the 


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FRATERNITY PINS W. V. U.PINS 

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Sartorial Designing and Tailoring is a Profession. 

It requires knowledge of the art of proper outlines, proper construction and proper 
harmony to be becoming to the particular individual — 



ALL SUITS 

ALL OVERCOATS 



YOU 

$15 



NO MORE 
NO LESS 



Besides "the know how" we have unlimited capital and superior equipment at your com- 
mand. Let us be your tailors 

The United Woolen Mills Company 

WEST VIRGINIA'S GREATEST TAILORS 

357 HIGH STREET, MORGANTOWN. WEST VIRGINIA 



PA R KERSBU RG 



CLARKSBURG 



CHARLESTON 



HUNTINGTON 



WHEELING 



YEE TOON 
WHITE STAR LAUNDRY 

Finest Hand Work in the City 
We Call for and Deliver Laundry 

426 High Street Morgantown, W. Va. 


THE M. C. LILLEY & CO. 

COLUMBUS. O. 

Manufacturers of High Grade College Uniforms, 
Equipment, Etc. Complete Catalogue on Request 


MARTIN COMPANY 

Merchant Tailors 
196 High Street Morgantown, W. Va. 


POWELL'S BARBER SHOP 

The Best Ever. Five Chair Shop. A First 
Class Barber at Every Chair. No Appren- 
tices or Bums employed. Professional, 
Business, College, and Military Hair Cut- 
ting a Specialty. Student Trade Especi- 
ally Solicited. 

189 Walnut Street T. E. POWELL, Proprietor 


Casey's J^ Pharmacy 
prescriptions 

Next Door to Postoffice Morgantown, W. Va. 


The Chancellor 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 

The Only Fireproof Hotel 
in the City 

AMERICAN PLAN ONLY 

RATES $2.50 - $4.00 


Morgantown Bakery 

Pure Bread, Buns, Rolls, Pies, Cakes 
and Fancy Goods 

FRED ERD, PROPRIETOR 

BOTH PHONES MAIN STREET 






Instead of the usual advertisement calling attention to the merits of my work, 1 prefer this 
year to express my appreciation of those who have loyally and faithfully assisted me. Whatever 
of success I may have attained with the students this year has been largely due to the efforts 
of my daughter, Winona, and Miss Blanche Lazzelle, to the uniform courtesy of the students, 
and especially to the kind patience of the Business Manager, Mr. Lewellyn. 

Wishing the Class of 1912 success in this and in every undertaking, I am, 

Yours respectfully, 

L. E. FRIEND, 

Official Photographer. 




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THIS BOOK WAS PRINTED AND BOUND 

BY THE 

ACME PUBLISHING COMPANY 

MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 



SPECIALTY MADE Or HIGH GRADE PRINTING AND BINDING